Aviva Premiership round 7 preview

first_imgNorthampton fansNorthampton v NewcastleNorthampton Saints’ only reversal in any competition this season was 17-24 at Saracens in Aviva Premiership Rugby on 26 September. The Saints only home defeat in a Premiership regular season fixture since Newcastle won at Franklin’s Gardens in February 2009 was 27-28 to Saracens in round 21 last season.Newcastle Falcons’ only victory in their last six games in all competitions was 22-16 in Bourgoin in the European Challenge Cup on 7 October. Falcons have won just one of their last ten away encounters: 32-30 at Sale on 23 April.Northampton did the Premiership double over Newcastle last season, whilst Falcons have won on two of their last four visits to Franklin’s Gardens.Saracens v ExeterSaracens have won five in a row in Aviva Premiership Rugby since their opening weekend defeat to London Irish at Twickenham. Sarries have won six of their last seven home matches in the Premiership.Exeter Chiefs have slipped to three successive Premiership defeats and are still to open their winning account away from home in Aviva Premiership Rugby.The two clubs have never met before in competitive rugby.Gloucester v LeicesterGloucester Rugby have tallied three successive victories in Aviva Premiership Rugby. Gloucester are unbeaten at Kingsholm in their last 15 matches in all competitions since Cardiff Blues won there in the Anglo-Welsh Cup on 8 November.All six games Leicester Tigers have played in the Premiership this season have been won by the home team on the day. Tigers’ have not been victorious away from home in the competition since round 20 last season with a 31-7 win at Newcastle.Gloucester’s only victory in their last half a dozen encounters with Leicester was 12-9 in this equivalent fixture last season. Tigers have won on three of their last four visits to Kingsholm. Harlequins v BathHarlequins’ last six matches in all competitions have been won by the home side on the day. Quins’ only defeat at the Twickenham Stoop in their last nine encounters was 16-20 against Northampton on 11 September.Bath Rugby’s only win in their last four Aviva Premiership Rugby matches was 31-16 at home to Sale in round four. Bath have been victorious once on the road in the Premiership this season: 32-16 at Leeds on the opening weekend.Bath’s 24-13 victory at the Rec the last time the two teams met ended a four game losing run to the Londoners. Bath have lost on their last five visits to the Stoop, and have won there just once in the Premiership since 2000: 18-10 on 25 September 2004.Leeds v WaspsLeeds Carnegie continue to be winless in Aviva Premiership Rugby since round 21 last season. Their most recent victory at Headingley Carnegie was 12-10 against Worcester Warriors on 25 April.London Wasps suffered their worst home defeat since 2004 when Northampton visited Adams Park on Sunday, however Wasps won their most recent away game in the Premiership 25-24 at Sale on 1 October.Leeds achieved a Premiership double over Wasps for the first time ever last season, whilst Wasps have won on six of their last seven visits to Headingley.London Irish v SaleLondon Irish top the Aviva Premiership Rugby table following four successive victories against Gloucester, Newcastle, Leeds and Exeter. The Exiles are unbeaten at home in any competition this season. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Sale Sharks have won their last three games in all competitions since their 24-25 reversal at home to Wasps on 1 October. The Sharks have won their last two away matches in Padova and Leeds and are going for a third successive victory on the road in the same season for the first time since 2006/07.Sale’s only victory over Irish in their last seven encounters was 14-8 at Edgeley Park on 9 January 2009. The Sharks’ most recent victory at Madejski Stadium was 31-14 on 15 October 2006.last_img read more

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Dave Attwood – The unexpected DIY Guru

first_imgOr perhaps you’d like a digital version of the magazine delivered direct to your PC, MAC or Ipad? If so click here. For Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170 visit CINCINNATI – NOVEMBER 21: Chad Ochocinco #85 and Terrell Owens #81 of the Cincinnati Bengals watch from the sideline during the final minutes of the Bengals 49-31 loss to the Buffalo Bills at Paul Brown Stadium on November 21, 2010 in Cincinnati, Ohio. (Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images) Dave Attwood, a very proud home-ownerThe new Bath lock puts down his power tools to chat to Bea AspreyRUGBY WORLD: What will you miss about Gloucester? Dave Attwood: The Shed. I’m yet to encounter fans as vocal as Gloucester’s.RW: What’s exciting about moving to Bath? DA: The fresh start. It’s a squad in transition and I’m looking forward to helping to forge the direction of the club with new team-mates.RW: Who are the jokers with England? DA: Haskell’s the king of the jokers in the senior squad. But the Saxons are a bit younger and not as confident. I’ve been impressed with Tom Johnson’s banter, though, and Billy Twelvetrees and Jordan Turner-Hall are jokers.RW: If your house was on fire, what three things would you save? DA: My new bed. It’s a super-king size with a supportive, deep-filled mattress. The bath tub, a big Victorian roll-top which wasn’t expensive but took ages to find. And my dog, Alfie, a black labrador.RW: Have you got any good nicknames? DA: I had the Quaffer at Bristol because I was partial to a drop of wine. But at Gloucester just Atters, or Big Dave.RW: Any phobias? DA: I’m scared of heights, which is odd for a tall man, although I’ve found out quite a lot of tall people are the same.RW: And bugbears? DA: It annoys me when you give someone a lift and they leave rubbish in the back of your car, like Will James!RW: If you could have one superpower, what would it be and why? DA: Super speed. I’m trying to do up my new house in Bath before I have to be out of my flat. I’ve got no idea how I’m going to get it all done!Cincinnati Bengals player Chad OchocincoRW: Who’d you like to be stuck in a lift with? DA: James Corden. Or the American Footballer Chad Ochocinco (left), because some of their banter is a million miles removed from what we’ve got here. I’d like to be a fly on the wall with Dave Flatman and him!RW: Top three dinner party guests? DA: Pippa Middleton, Ryan Giggs and Ricky Gervais, because he’d have no qualms about discussing any of the things we’d like to discuss at dinner!RW: What couldn’t you live without? DA: Power tools and collar stiffeners. I hate having an untidy collar.RW: What’s your idea of a dream holiday? DA: I had one last year. I was in a spa for a week on a beach in St Lucia. I did absolutely nothing!RW: What’s your favourite cuisine? DA: I like English food, like pies and stews and mashed potato. But I love Italian food. Pizza, risotto, ragús…RW: Any bad habits?DA: Correcting other people’s grammar. I’m no saint myself, but I still correct others!RW: How do you switch off from rugby? DA: It depends on the time of year. I’ve played a lot of Call of Duty, but not for a few months. At the minute I’m having a whale of a time sanding down a coal chute!RW: Any regrets? DA: Stamping on Petrisor (Toderasc, the La Rochelle prop). It had a significant impact but I’m moving in the right direction again. (video below)RW: What three things would you take to a desert island? DA: Plenty of reading material. Fresh towels, because it’s annoying when your towel gets sandy. And a lilo.RW: What would you like to achieve outside of rugby? DA: I like physical challenges, and I’d like to climb Kilimanjaro. I cycled round Iceland with Bristol, and the year before we kayaked the Norwegian fjords.RW: Who have been your best and worst room-mates? DA: The best was Alex Brown because he’s clean and tidy. I’m not great because I snore! And maybe Paulie (Doran-Jones) because you have to put up with his brutal banter.RW: How would you like to be remembered? DA: As someone who’s practical and useful. And as someone who achieved things, both in a rugby sense and wider scheme of things.The only regret Dave Attwood has…This article appeared in the August 2011 issue of Rugby World Magazine.Find a newsagent that sells Rugby World in the UK LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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Our pick of the 2012 Calenders

first_img7. Ben CohenBen’s fifth calendar will benefit his charity, the Stand Up Foundation, which is working to stamp out bullying. Visit standupfoundation.com to buy yours. They’re on sale for $30 (£19.34).8. EnglandFrom Chris Ashton to Courtney Lawes, these are some of the boys’ best action shots. Priced £7.99 from rfudirect.com9. WalesAdd a bit of Millennium magic to your day with these pics of the Welsh boys on the pitch. Go to store.wru.co.uk to get yours, for £7.99.10. Iestyn ThomasThomas and his Scarlets team-mates have stripped off for charity as part of the prop’s testimonial year. Priced £10 from shop.scarlets.co.uk, proceeds from the calendar go to Thomas’s chosen charities – Tenovus, MS Resource Centre and Parasol. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Fancy waking up to your favourite rugby stars? If naked bods will make you choke on your cornflakes, there are plenty of action-packed options, too, and many raise money for good causes.1. IrelandRelive some of the green giants’ best moments with this calendar. Priced €9.99 (£8.60) from elverys.ie/irishrugbyshop2. Peter BuxtonBucko & Co are raising money for Winston’s Wish and the Wooden Spoon. It’s available from Gloucester’s club shop or Hudson Sports, Glos, for a suggested donation of £10.3. Stade FrancaisThe most luxurious and extravagant of all, this year Sébastien Torresin (right), Paul Sackey and Tom Palmer have bared all. Priced €26.60 (£22.87) from boutique.stade.fr4. Matt HampsonThe best moments of England’s Six Nations and 2011 World Cup campaigns are on show in Hambo’s calendar. It costs £9.99, and proceeds go to the Matt Hampson Foundation. Go to matthampson.co.uk5. Rugby for HeroesYou’ll see some of the Premiership’s stars in a whole new light when you flick through this calendar! The brainchild of Ryan Lamb’s dad, Alan, all proceeds go to Help for Heroes. It’s priced £9.99 from rugbyforheroes.org.uk6. UlsterThe pics go behind the scenes with the Belfast boys as they pump iron in the gym. Priced £7.95, or £6 for season-ticket holders, they’re on sale at Ravenhill, or go to bit.ly/u1nrBB for details of other stockists.center_img 11. EdinburghNick De Luca was the driving force behind this initiative, which is raising money for the Maggie’s cancer charity. It’s just £5 – get one from edinburgh rugbycalendar.com12. Seoul SistersThe South Korean ladies’ team that stars in this offering is made up mostly of expats. Each player represents a country that played at RWC 2011. Get yourself a copy for $20 (£12.99) by emailing [email protected]last_img read more

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Top 14: A TV bidding farce and its benefits

first_img All flashing lights: The Top 14, with all it’s glamourous names and flashy displays, has landed a big pay dayBy Gavin MortimerThere really isn’t such a thing as a dull day in French rugby. Take last week. On Tuesday the LNR announced with a fanfare that they had agreed a record TV deal with Canal Plus, one worth €71m-a-season for the next five years. On Wednesday, satirical newspaper Le Canard enchaîné (the Gallic equivalent of our own Private Eye) broke a story linking the FFR to a police investigation into money laundering.Then on Thursday beIN Sport made plain their disgust with the way the TV deal had been agreed and threatened legal action. Oh, and just for good measure there was a fresh blast from Mourad Boudjellal, the Toulon owner threatening to boycott the Top 14 if the television money isn’t more “rationally distributed” this time around.Wanting more: Mourad BoudjellalLet’s start with the new television deal agreed between the LNR and Canal Plus, worth a jaw-dropping €355m over five years. The current broadcasting deal with Canal is miserly in comparison, just €31.7m a season, so understandably the clubs are cock-a-hoop. So is the LNR, conveniently ignoring that only a few months ago some of the clubs were saying they believed nothing less than a €100m-a season deal would suffice.The LNR has good reason to be chuffed, particularly as on December 2, they were on the brink of signing a deal with Canal Plus worth €66m a season. Yet the day after the news was broken in the Monday edition of Midi Olympique, the deal was off with accusations flying around faster than boots in a ruck. One allegation was that LNR reckoned they could get more out of beIN. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Racing Metro’s French flanker Camille Gerondeau is tackled by Oyonnax’ Argentinian scrum-half Agustin Figuerola during a French Top 14 rugby union match between Oyonnax and Racing Metro on January 4, 2014 at the Charles-Mathon Stadium in Oyonnax. AFP PHOTO / ROMAIN LAFABREGUE (Photo credit should read ROMAIN LAFABREGUE/AFP/Getty Images) The upshot was the LNR announced no deal had been signed and that bids would be accepted until January 13 with the winner unveiled within 48 hours.Canal Plus were allegedly furious and lawyers were consulted, and then what happened? On January 10, the bidding process was suspended by the LNR and the next day, according to Midi Olympique, they reopened negotiations with Canal and a deal was duly signed, sealed and delivered.All of which has left beINSport less than amused and they are now muttering about seeking legal recourse. In a statement they said they “regretted the absence of respect and transparency” in the bidding process, alleging that Canal Plus used the threat of legal action to pressurise the LNR into agreeing to a deal. Certainly it is curious that the LNR signed a deal for €71m-a-season with Canal when BeIN were purportedly ready to offer €80m. in an interview with Le Figaro newspaper last week, BeIN’s director general, Youssef al-Obaidly, indicated his wrath was directed primarily at Canal, “who have done everything to protect their monopoly.” It short, the whole bidding process has been a farce, albeit one that has considerably enriched the LNR and probably best benefited the fans. Canal Plus have been diligently covering French domestic rugby for two decades and their savoir-faire is unquestionable.Dropped ball?: The image of French rugby may be damagedAs for the FFR and their own imbroglio, that still has some way to run with Midi Olympique warning in its edition of January 20, that the exposee in last week’s Le Canard enchaîné  might have “opened Pandora’s Box”. Certainly the allegations are serious, namely that the FFR is caught up in a money laundering scheme linked to drugs and prostitution in the French underworld. There is no suggestion that those at the heart of the FFR were aware that international tickets were being bought with ‘dirty money’ but nonetheless the last week has not been a good one for the image of French rugby. As Midi Olyimpique lamented in its Monday editorial, money is eating into the ethics of rugby.last_img read more

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What’s in the latest issue of Rugby World?

first_imgUncovered – Recent retiree James Simpson-Daniel looks to the futureTour tale – Japes on tour with the 1974 Lions Find out what’s inside our European club rugby special! Carl Hayman – Toulon’s captain looks back at his career and lifts the lid on Europe’s reigning championsMark Bennett – It’s been one hell of a journey for the young Scottish centre to end up back in Glasgow with the WarriorsDan Biggar – Shy and retiring off the pitch, loud and proud on it, the Ospreys stand-off is keen to ignore the criticism and just play his gameChallenge Cup – Jack Nowell and Luke Cowan-Dickie talk through European competition with us on the crazy golf course25 innovations– Here are the big changes that rocked rugbySam Burgess – We ask players who have switched between rugby league and rugby union if they think Sam Burgess will be a successBig debate– Was it right to hand the European Champions Cup final to Twickenham? Here are the argumentsWomen’s rugby – The World Cup was fantastic and it’s great to see some players going pro but the women’s game must be watchful, warns Stephen JonesADVICE SECTIONRugby focus – It’s back! News from clubs, schools and women’s rugby here!Pro Insight – Ben Youngs tells Rugby World about decision-making at the breakdownFitness – Our new-look guide shows you how to spring like Izzy FolauPro Playbook – Shane Howarth looks at attacking movesMini Rugby – How to play rugby netballREGULARSEssentials – The latest books and products LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img IT’S A new age in Europe, with the launch of the European Rugby Champions Cup and Challenge Cup. The latest edition of Rugby World gives you the skinny on every pool! As well as talking with the biggest personalities in the competitions, we look at previous champions and consider the possible issues ahead.On top of that, Rugby World looks at the biggest innovations to shake the game since its inception, we talk with those hardy souls who have swapped between rugby league and rugby union to see if they think Sam Burgess will be a success and Stephen Jones has a warning for the women’s game.Here is a full list of contents – and you can find out where to buy your copy here or download our free magazine finder app here. Plus, download the digital edition here.SIDELINESThis month we look at the most intriguing match-ups to come in the Champions Cup, Bernard Lapasset’s concerns for the Rio Olympics and talk with Steve Borthwick about life in Japan.COLUMNISTSJohn Kirwan– All Blacks hero Sir John Kirwan is in the UK in November, coaching the Baa-Baas. He tells us about itChris Cracknell– The sevens specialist gives us his views as the HSBC Sevens World SeriesGareth Davies– The Dragons’ Chief Executive was recently elected to the WRU board. He talks about the state of the Welsh gameSPOTLIGHTSJames Haskell– Wasps’ captain talks us through his career to dateScott Williams– A leader? At such a young age the Scarlet is a senior playerFelix Jones – The Munster full-back hopes his side can push on following a tough startScott MacLeod – Making trips over the border between Hawick and Newcastle is part of life for the second-rowFEATURESOwen Farrell – Here comes another monumental season for England and Saracens’ plucky fly-halfLeinster – Can the province triumph in Europe again? Tom English looks at their chances TAGS: Highlight last_img read more

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The greatest fly-halves of all time: Phil Bennett

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Major teams: Llanelli Country: WalesTest span: 1969-78Wales caps: 29 (26 starts)Lions caps: 8 (8 starts)Test points: 210 (5T, 20C, 46P, 4DG)How many pints of Brains beer have been sunk while Welsh rugby fans have debated whether Phil Bennett or Barry John is the greatest fly-half the world has ever seen? Thousands, no doubt, as it has been one of rugby’s favourite debating points.Those in the Bennett camp cite the Llanelli man’s part in the unbeaten Lions tour of 1974 and his magical series of sidesteps that started the length-of-the-pitch move for Gareth Edwards’s breathtaking Barbarians try against New Zealand.Certainly, Bennett’s footwork was unparalleled. His long-time half-back partner Edwards said he was “a fantastic stepper but sometimes I think even Phil didn’t know where his sidesteps would take him”.Talking to The Daily Telegraph in 2009, Edwards also dubbed the former steelworker “an instinctive genius” and anyone who saw Bennett’s performance in the second Lions Test against South Africa in 1974 couldn’t disagree, as the No 10 had the game of his life, creating tries for his team-mates in a 28-9 drubbing and scoring a brilliant one himself with a trademark sidestepping run from deep. His place in the pantheon of greats is undisputed, however. “Fundamentally, he was a shy Felinfoel boy,” says JJ Williams in the book Behind the Dragon. “He had massive natural ability. Sometimes he was bewildering to watch. The London Welsh boys, JPR and John Taylor, would accuse him of not doing for Wales what he’d do for Llanelli. But come on, he was one of the greatest rugby players of all time.”Bennett captained Wales eight times from 1977 and his Test career finished with a flourish in 1978 as he scored two tries in a 16-7 win over France to clinch his second Grand Slam. He was awarded an OBE the following year. A leg injury almost ended his tour at that juncture, but skipper Willie John McBride was so against Bennett going home that he literally carried him around for the next few days to help him heal. Bennett, unable to run properly in the third Test as his legs were numb with painkillers, dropped two goals as the series was clinched in Port Elizabeth.Bennett made his Wales debut aged 20 as the nation’s first Test replacement, but didn’t secure the No 10 jersey until John retired in 1972. He had his down times: he briefly lost his place to John Bevan and later floundered under the pressure of the Lions captaincy on the unsuccessful and rain-plagued 1977 tour to New Zealand. TAGS: The Greatest Players Magical feet and an adventurer’s spirit were just two of the qualities that made Welshman Phil Bennett a fly-half legend long before his playing career had ended Phil Bennett of Wales last_img read more

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Ospreys v Dragons live stream: How to watch from anywhere

first_imgLiberty Stadium hosts this Welsh derby this afternoon – here are all the details In the clear: Dragons prop Leon Brown scores against the Ospreys in January (Inpho) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Ospreys v Dragons live stream: How to watch the Pro14 match online from anywhereThe Guinness Pro14 is back and the penultimate match of the first weekend sees the Dragons travel to the Liberty Stadium to face the Ospreys.Neither side can make the semi-finals, with the Ospreys in particularly poor form before the season was suspended. They sit bottom of Conference A with only two wins in 13 games while Dragons are a couple of places above them in fifth.When the two sides met at Rodney Parade in Janaury, the Dragons beat the Ospreys 25-18, but who will hit the ground running after the Covid-enforced break?Wales centre Nick Tompkins, who has joined on a year-long loan from Saracens, will make his Dragons debut, as will lock Joe Maksymiw, while fly-half Sam Davies will captain the side against his former club.In the Ospreys No 10 shirt will be Stephen Myler, who is playing his first game for the region, and he is joined at half-back by Rhys Webb, who is back at the Ospreys following his stint in France with Toulon.Ospreys: Dan Evans; George North, Owen Watkin, Kieran Williams, Luke Morgan; Stephen Myler, Rhys Webb; Nicky Smith, Sam Parry, Tom Botha, Adam Beard, Alun Wyn Jones, Olly Cracknell, Justin Tipuric (captain), Morgan Morris.Replacements: Dewi Lake, Gareth Thomas, Nicky Thomas, Bradley Davies, Will Griffiths, Reuben Morgan-Williams, Josh Thomas, Tiaan Thomas-Wheeler.Dragons: Dafydd Howells; Owen Jenkins, Nick Tompkins, Jack Dixon, Ashton Hewitt; Sam Davies (captain), Tavis Knoyle; Brok Harris, Richard Hibbard, Leon Brown, Matthew Screech, Joe Maksymiw, Ben Fry, Taine Basham, Ross Moriarty.Replacements: Ellis Shipp, Conor Maguire, Chris Coleman, Joe Davies, Aaron Wainwright, Luke Baldwin, Arwel Robson, Adam Warren.Here’s how to find a reliable live stream for Ospreys v Dragons, wherever you are.How to watch Ospreys v Dragons from outside your countryIf you’re abroad, but still want to watch your local Pro14 coverage, like Ospreys v Dragons, you can do so by using a VPN – Virtual Private Network.VPNs allow you to get around any geo-blocking by changing your IP address so you appear in a different location and can watch the same legal Pro14 live stream you would at home.Our friends at TechRadar have tested hundreds of VPN and recommend ExpressVPN, which is easy to use, has strong security features and allows you to watch on several devices at once, including smart TVs and phones, iPads, tablets, PCs and Macs.Plus, ExpressVPN comes with a 30-day money-back guarantee. You can try it out for a month for free – perfect timing to watch the end of the Pro14 season – or sign up for an annual plan and get three months free.Check out ExpressVPN Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Premier Sports show every Guinness Pro14 match live in the UK. If you have a Sky or Virgin Media contract, you can add Premier Sports to your package from £9.99 a month.Or subscribe to Premier Player so you can stream matches online from £9.99 a month or £99 for 12 months, which would include the 2020-21 Pro14 season too. That is due to start on 3 October.See Premier Sports offersIf you’re from the UK but are overseas when there’s a particular match you want to watch, you can get your normal live stream but you’ll need a VPN – see the information above.Ospreys v Dragons live stream: How to watch from IrelandIn Ireland, eir Sport show every Pro14 match live, including Ospreys v Dragons (kick-off 2.15pm, eir Sport 2), and if you sign up for eir broadband you can watch eir Sport for free via the eir TV app and online player.Find out more about the eir broadband deals here.Or you can sign up for eir TV and broadband packages, which include eir Sport, from €39.98 a month.If you have Sky TV in Ireland but not eir broadband, you can add eir Sport to your package for €19.99 a month for three months (€29.99 after that) or for €240 for the year – here are the details of the Sky-eir package.Ospreys v Dragons live stream: How to watch from EuropeIf you’re in Austria, Germany, Italy or Switzerland, you can watch Ospreys v Dragons (kick-off 3.15pm) through the live and on-demand streaming service DAZN, which is compatible with smart TVs and phones, tablets, PCs, streaming sticks, set-top boxes, gaming consoles and more.Ospreys v Dragons live stream: How to watch from the CanadaDAZN, which allows you to live stream sport or watch it on demand, is the place to go to watch Ospreys v Dragons in Canada. It will kick off at 9.15am EST and 6.15am on the West Coast.Find out more about DAZN here Ospreys v Dragons live stream: How to watch from New ZealandIf you want to tune in to Ospreys v Dragons from New Zealand, the match kicks off at 1.15am on Monday morning on Sky Sport NZ 1.It costs $31.99 a month to add Sky Sport to your Sky Starter pack ($25.99) but if you sign up for 12 months before 30 September 2020 you’ll get your first month free. Plus, you’ll get Sky Go, which allows you to watch live rugby wherever you are.Sky Sport NZ offer Ospreys v Dragons live stream: How to watch from the UKOspreys v Dragons, which kicks off at 2.15pm today, will be shown live on Premier Sports 1 in the UK. We recommend VPN services in the context of legal recreational uses. For example:Accessing a service from another country (subject to the terms and conditions of that service)Protecting your online security and strengthening your online privacy when abroadWe do not support or condone the illegal or malicious use of VPN services. Consuming pirated content that is paid-for is neither endorsed nor approved by Future Publishing. last_img read more

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Former General Seminary dean James Corner Fenhagen dies at 82

first_img Story updated April 11 to reflect change in committal service.[Episcopal News Service] A funeral service was held April 9 at Holy Cross Faith Memorial Episcopal Church for the Rev. James Corner Fenhagen, 82, who died at Tidelands Community Hospice in Pawleys Island, South Carolina, on April 5.A second public memorial service is planned in Washington National Cathedral’s Bethlehem Chapel at 2 p.m. EDT April 21. A reception will follow in the cathedral’s College of Preachers building. Fenhagen served as president and warden of the College of Preachers at Washington National Cathedral from 2001-2004. A private committal service will also take place at the cathedral on April 21.Fenhagen, a native of Baltimore, Maryland, was named president and dean of the General Theological Seminary in New York in 1978 and retired from there in 1992. While at General, he taught in areas related to Christian spirituality and the practice of ministry. He was well known for having helped develop the concept of mutual ministry.He then became director of the Cornerstone Project of the Episcopal Church Foundation, retiring in 1995. Cornerstone explored issues of clergy and congregational health, wholeness and holiness.Fenhagen graduated from St. Paul’s School and attended Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Virginia, before receiving his bachelor of arts degree from Sewanee: The University of the South in Tennessee in 1951. He earned a master of divinity degree from Virginia Theological Seminary in 1954, and was awarded honorary degrees from Virginia Theological Seminary, the University of the South’s School of Theology, and Washington and Lee University.Fenhagen served parishes in Maryland, the District of Columbia and South Carolina, and was also director of the Church and Ministry Program at the Hartford Seminary Foundation.Fenhagen is survived by his wife, Eulalie McFall Fenhagen, two sons and two grandchildren. He was predeceased in 2005 by a daughter, Eulalie (Leila) Swinton Fenhagen.In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions can be made to Holy Cross Faith Memorial Episcopal Church, PO Box 990, Pawleys Island, SC, 29585, or Tidelands Community Hospice Inc., 2591 N. Fraser St., Georgetown, SC, 29440. April 10, 2012 at 5:01 pm Jim was a dear friend and mentor and pillar of support. Douglas E. Theuner says: Former General Seminary dean James Corner Fenhagen dies at 82 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Albany, NY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL John T. Docker says: Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA April 10, 2012 at 5:37 pm Jim was many things to many people…..all good, by the Grace of God……to none more so than to the Hispanics who came to know our Lord through the Instituto Pastoral Hispano when Jim was Dean of GTS. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs John Denham says: Donn Mitchell says: April 10, 2012 at 7:41 pm Jim was dean of General during the years I was a student. I will never forget the warmth and humor that pervaded Chelsea Square in those days, largely due to Jim’s pastoral style and personal warmth. My condolences to Eulalie and the family and my thanks to God for a life and ministry well-lived. April 14, 2012 at 8:41 pm Jim was one of the saints to be sure. His pastoral presence was always in the forefront and he helped me to hone skills and a passion for parish ministry. God bless; my condolences to Eulalie. April 10, 2012 at 9:54 pm I will miss this good man. God’s peace to his family. Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Featured Events April 11, 2012 at 1:24 pm For many years in the 1960 and 1970s, Jim was my closest and dearest friend. He and Eulalie welcomed me to their home in Georgetown and on summer holidays at Pawley’s Island on numerous occasions. He was outgoing, cheerful, generous and always supportive of my ministries. Although we retired on opposite coasts, a picture of him and Eulalie in cowboy hats reminds me of our good days together. I will miss him. The Rt. Rev. James M. Adams says: April 18, 2012 at 4:17 pm So many gifts shared in so many ways in so many venues. Thx. Servant, very well done. Comments (12) Margaret Bullitt-Jonas says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing Richard Lief says: Submit a Press Release Curate Diocese of Nebraska Cathedral Dean Boise, ID April 12, 2012 at 7:39 pm I had the privilege of working closely with Jim during his first ten years at General, he as Dean and President and I as a trustee. He brought new life and vigor when it was badly needed. His leadership was inspiring and his friendship a treasured gift. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Shreveport, LA People Tags Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK April 11, 2012 at 10:21 am Jim informed my life as an Episcopalian through his character, friendship and his books that are dog-earred in my library from their many readings. We’ve maintained contact since his days at Old St. John’s in Georgetown, DC. We have lost a saint, and heaven has gained one. Obituary, Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books April 11, 2012 at 9:50 am God bless you Jim. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Knoxville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA Paul Briggs says: Rector Washington, DC By ENS staffPosted Apr 9, 2012 Rector Belleville, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Press Release Service Talmage Bandy says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Tampa, FL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York April 10, 2012 at 6:50 pm I am saddened to hear of Jim’s death. We served together as chaplains to the House of Bishops in the late 1990’s, and I give thanks that I knew him and Eulalie during those years. May he rest in peace and rise in glory. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Smithfield, NC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Comments are closed. Len Freeman says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit an Event Listing April 13, 2012 at 9:16 am As a student representative, I was part of the search/calling committee for Jim when he was brought in as Dean of GTS. Serving with Bishop Wolf of Maine, alumni, board members and other seminarians, helping to bring Jim to GTS was a highlight of my life. A good man, with a faith that spoke of his love of Jesus, led many to seek vovcation and life in the Church. Our prayers for Eulalie continue. May his soul and all the souls of the faithfully departed rest in peace. JackMMcKelvey says: Charles Newbery says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS last_img read more

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Environmental stewardship fellows foster ministry rooted in creation

first_img This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 When kids get out into the natural world they develop a sense of awe and wonder, and are more likely pay attention of environmental issues as they get older, says Cindy Coe, one of two environmental stewardship fellows. Here Erynn Smith, Abundant Table’s director of farm education, shows some young students how look for bugs in the field. Photo: The Abundant Table[Episcopal News Service] The Episcopal Church is addressing the call of the fifth Mark of Mission to strive to safeguard the integrity of creation and sustain and renew the life of the earth in a number of ways, including through the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society’s support for the work of two women who want to bring Episcopalians of all ages in closer touch with the earth.In Tennessee, Cindy Coe’s focus is “getting children outside” to grow a lifelong concern for creation and, in California, Sarah Nolan’s is helping the church see “good agriculture and good food as a justice issue.”Each of them is six months into a two-year, $48,000 environmental stewardship fellowship awarded by the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society to provide leadership on key environmental issues in U.S. communities.“The environmental fellowship program represents a new way in which the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society is engaging and supporting mission at a local level,” said Alexander D. Baumgarten, director of public engagement and mission communication for The Episcopal Church.“Conceived and awarded through a process of consultation that included members of the Executive Council, bishops and other leaders, and key stakeholders in environmental ministry, the fellowships allow the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society not only to support innovation and creativity at a local level, but to ensure that it becomes a gift to the wider Church,” said Baumgarten.The Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society staff consults regularly with the environmental fellows to discern ways, beyond the program’s funding, to support the fellows’ work. (The Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society is the legal and canonical name under which The Episcopal Church is incorporated, conducts business, and carries out mission.)“The Justice and Advocacy Mark 5 Fellowships are crucial to the future of our Church as we seek to reconnect with our food sources, lift up the intersections of poverty and environmental issues, and understand what we can do as individuals and church communities to mitigate and adapt to our changing climate,” said Jayce Hafner, domestic policy analyst in the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society’s Office of Government Relations.Abundant Table Episcopal Service Corps Intern Jeannette Ban harvests salad greens. The Abundant Table’s origin is rooted in the Episcopal Service Corps, a partner of the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society. Photo: The Abundant TableNolan, she said, “will grow networks of communities striving for conscientious consumption (for example, procuring elements of worship from local growers) and dedicated to learning more about how our food is produced.”Coe’s fellowship involves what Hafner called “the next generation of leaders” who are “an essential contingent of our Church.”“Through educating youth at summer camp, an environment where self-awareness and creative expression is encouraged, she will empower future leaders to leverage their gifts for the ecological well-being of our Church and our world,” she said.Hafner looks “forward to seeing the fruits of these fellows’ efforts, and am already very impressed by how much they have accomplished thus far,”Coe’s interest in environmental stewardship issues was rooted when she developed Episcopal Relief & Development’s Abundant Life Garden Project with Brian Sellers Petersen, who is now senior advisor to the president of Episcopal Relief & Development. The project is an interactive, Scripture-based program that invites elementary school-aged students to explore the organization’s work through the themes of water, seeds, soil, animals and harvest.The curriculum for dioceses, congregations and other Episcopal institutions that Coe is devising during the life of her fellowship is an outgrowth of that project and will involve a healthy dose of getting kids outside, “spending time in nature and experiencing the environment,” she said.“I would like to introduce creation care as part of Christian formation of children and youth in our church,” she said.Saying she has “really done a deep dive” into secular research on environmental education, Coe believes that such education is connected to wellness, developing spirituality and becoming aware of the social-justice issues connected to the care of creation.Getting children connected to nature means “they will become attuned to environmental issues and stick with it for life,” Coe said.Her research has also included debriefing her 10-year-old son, Jack, about what he liked and didn’t like at various summer camps. “He has been an invaluable resource,” she said with a laugh. “He’s given me some really valuable information about what works, what’s effective, what was fun, what was boring.”“As far as teaching about nature, we have to get kids outside,” she said, adding that research shows children like to find a special place outside to make their own. Part of the budding curriculum will encourage children to “go out, find a special place, build a fort and have fun with it.”By doing that sort of thing, children develop a sense of place, Coe said, and “they learn to appreciate God’s creation.”“You learn a sense of awe, a sense of wonder and that links into spirituality,” she said. St. Francis and other saints understood and honored the connection between nature and spirituality, Coe added, but “that’s something that we’ve either forgotten or neglected in our Christian history lately.”Yet, “Kids get this. Kids can be silent in nature better than the rest of us,” she said.Coe has been asking for feedback from colleagues around the church on the parts of the curriculum that she has completed. She plans to discuss it at late January meetings of the Episcopal Camps and Conference Centers organization and of FORMA, a group of Episcopal Church formation ministers.The curriculum, which can be used in whole or in part, will be available to be field tested in the summer of 2015. She will then tweak the materials with feedback she gets. The sections of the curriculum that are currently available can be found here. That page also includes a method for giving Coe feedback.The next step is to find a way or ways to publish the curriculum before the summer of 2016.Connecting Episcopalians to the earth is also the taproot of Nolan’s fellowship work, as is connecting Episcopalians involved in food-based ministries to each other. Those ministries across the church are “innovative and life-giving” and, yet, they are fragmented, she said.Nolan is the director of programs and community partnerships for The Abundant Table, a Ventura County, California, sustainable farm that offers “faith-rooted, land-based and farm-to-school experiential learning opportunities for school-aged children, youth, young adults and communities,” according to its website. The organization also provides greater access to sustainably grown foods for residents of the southern California county.Its roots date to the mid-2000s when Nolan was campus chaplain at California State University, Channel Islands. The chaplaincy decided to start a program through the Episcopal Service Corps, a partner of the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society, in a rural setting and bring the campus ministry and the wider community to that work. As the farm grew, young adults approached the ministry expressing an interest in connecting their interest in food justice to their faith life. Their interest overran the farm’s number of internship placements, Nolan said.Abundant Table team members celebrate their muddy carrot harvest. Carrots from the sustainable farm will go to the Ventura Unified School District in California. Photo: The Abundant TableShe began looking for other places where those young adults might work. That exploration led in 2012 to a fellowship from the Episcopal Church Foundation to begin to grow a network of folks doing land-based ministry and identifying resources for those ministries. Soon she was in touch with a number of people, among them Brian Sellers Peterson, with whom Coe had worked with on the Abundant Life Garden project. Sellers Peterson had been looking at food-based ministries around the church and connected her with the Beeken Center, part of the University of the South’s School of Theology. She, Sellers Peterson and the center began developing an informal network of ministries. That work led to her application for the environmental stewardship fellowship, she said.Strengthening the loose network that already exists among the church’s food-growing and food-sharing ministries could impact both the church and the communities in which is present in two ways, Nolan said.One is involves connecting church pantries with church-supported gardens and farms, while also looking at the potential of the church’s buildings and lands to see how they could be “used and coordinated in such a way that it makes an impact on the local communities and the food system” in those communities.Secondly, Nolan notes that there is “a lot of work going on around theology, liturgy and spirituality that’s really rooted in the earth, environmental stewardship and creation care.” She sees an opportunity to help people share those resources in order to “connect folks to a growing spirituality that would have an impact on the spiritual life of the church [by] invigorating and renewing the theological and spiritual life of the church.”“The term that’s been thrown around quite a bit is looking at soil as sacrament,” Nolan added.At the end of her fellowship time, Nolan said, she hopes to have developed a website or some other platform, modeled on the practices of Story Corps, where Episcopalians involved in food-based ministries can share their stories as “encouragement and also as an inspiration” to the church. Her other hoped-for outcome is the formation of a functioning network that can hold gatherings and support regional and national efforts.And, Nolan said, her work is not just for people already involved in such ministry.“It’s important for the church to see how the growing and sharing of food is an open door to understanding environmental sustainability and stewardship,” she said.Often environmental conversations center on climate change and conservation of natural spaces, which Nolan acknowledged as important, but she said the church’s food, farming and gardening work can be a way for people who might not be inclined to participate in those conversations to get involved. By participating in such work, they can discover the links between environmental concerns and seeing “good agriculture and good food as a justice issue.”The 2013-2015 budget passed by General Convention is structured around the Anglican Communion’s Five Marks of Mission and provided significant unallocated sums for new work targeted around each Mark of Mission. The intention was that the resulting work would be done in new, collaborative partnerships with dioceses and congregations. The Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society has provided seed money and/or matching grants as well as staff support and expertise for the new work.Coe’s and Nolan’s fellowships are support out of the budget allocations for Mark Five: To strive to safeguard the integrity of creation and sustain and renew the life of the earth.The recently released Report to the Church details the budget-supported work of the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society to date in the current triennium.— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Advocacy Peace & Justice, Curate Diocese of Nebraska Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Report to the Church 2015 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Rector Belleville, IL Submit a Job Listing Rector Bath, NC Rector Shreveport, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Comments (1) The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Tampa, FL Featured Jobs & Calls By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jan 30, 2015 Featured Events Tags TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ David Romain says: Submit a Press Release Comments are closed. Submit an Event Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN Press Release Service Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Pittsburgh, PA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Collierville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Albany, NY Environment & Climate Change, Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ Environmental stewardship fellows foster ministry rooted in creation An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ February 4, 2015 at 12:27 am It is quite encouraging to see and hear about young people being exposed to God in Nature! We, the Christian Church, owe it to the Risen Christ to reconcile the sins of our Christian for-bearers, who cursed our evolved modern society with the Doctrine of Discovery, the Divine Rights of Kings and the concept of polluting Earth and blaming God for their sins! I am grateful for the children coming along to clean up the mess that we have made! We need to rally behind them and truly take care of God’s creation, as a most sacred obligation! Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DClast_img read more

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Church considers long-term response to Flint’s water crisis

first_img Selena Smith says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopalians were challenged to bring water to the Diocesan Convention’s closing Eucharist at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in downtown Flint, Michigan, in October 2015. Photo: Diocese of Eastern Michigan.[Episcopal News Service] Churches and other community-based organizations responded first, providing Flint residents with bottled water and filters for their taps long before Michigan officials acknowledged people were drinking lead-contaminated water.Over the last two weeks, Flint’s water crisis and the state’s failure to respond, have dominated mainstream headlines, with President Barack Obama declaring a “state of emergency,” and last week Governor Rick Snyder using his State of the State address to apologize to Flint residents.It was the persistence of community groups, like Water You Fighting For and Concerned Pastors for Social Action, who organized protests, press conferences and publicity for more than a year and a half, that brought the crisis to the attention of local and state officials, explained the Rev. Dan Scheid, rector of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church.“This is a social-justice issue. The poor and marginalized simply were not listened to by those in power, they were repeatedly told the water is fine, the water is fine, and at some point they realized that the water wasn’t good and it’s going to take additional reporting and digging to find out who knew what when,” he said. “October 1st [2015] is when the governor said he knew, and that’s when things started to change.”In April 2014, under the leadership of an emergency manager and in an effort to save $5 million, the city’s water supply was switched from Lake Huron via Detroit’s municipal water system to the Flint River, a more corrosive source that caused lead leaching from aging pipe infrastructure to contaminate resident’s water. (The city of Detroit has had its own water issues.)The water also didn’t meet U.S. Environmental Protection Agency standards for carcinogens associated with industrial pollution, explained Eastern Michigan Bishop Todd Ousley, whose diocese includes Flint.“Furthermore,” he said. “There is evidence of falsification of water tests, withholding of test information, and coercion of state and local officials to ignore disturbing water test results.”Earlier this month, the regional EPA official resigned over the crisis.Almost immediately following the switch, residents began to complain about the water’s color, taste and smell, and the skin irritation caused by bathing in it, yet government officials maintained the water’s safety. It was the efforts of community leaders and pastors, who spoke up for the city’s majority black and impoverished residents, that caught the attention of physicians and academics who conducted studies countering the government’s claims. Of the city’s 100,000 residents, 9,000 are children under age 6, the population most vulnerable to the cognitive and developmental delays associated with lead poisoning.“As for the long-term health, educational and psychological effects on the generation of babies, toddlers and preschoolers, we don’t know what that will look like, how will that be measured and attended to,” said Scheid.Scheid became the rector of St. Paul’s in May of 2015, after serving as rector of St. Augustine of Canterbury in Benton Harbor, another Michigan city that has been under emergency management.Before state officials acknowledged the public health crisis and deployed the National Guard door-to-door handing out bottled water, filters and testing kits, community-based organizations and churches stepped up.St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in downtown Flint served as a water distribution point, and with grant assistance from the dioceses of Eastern and Western Michigan and donations from parishes across lower Michigan, partnered with the Food Bank of Eastern Michigan, the soup kitchen at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, on the city’s east side, the north side’s Christ Enrichment Center and other organizations to make sure the city’s residents had access to clean water.With a $5,000 grant from Episcopal Relief & Development, St. Paul’s, channeling the money through the United Way, was able to replace water filters in schools, reaching 25 percent of the student population.Moving forward, one of the ways churches and other community-based organizations are looking to respond to residents’ needs is by making sure they have access to healthy, fresh foods. Evidence has shown that foods rich in iron and vitamin C can ameliorate the effects of lead poisoning, said Scheid.“The issue is that much of the food that comes through the food bank, fresh stuff, is on the verge of spoiling and getting appropriate food from the food bank is a challenge,” said Scheid, adding that Flint is a food desert. “This is something we are looking at, could we do something to address nutrition in a meaningful way, could we purchase top quality food for distribution to families.”Another long-term issue is addressing residents’ spiritual and psychological needs.“The trauma, the fear and the anger of the adults, parents and grandparents, knowing that you may have given your children contaminated water for months and months and the associated guilt,” said Scheid.With a population less than 100,000, Flint, once one of the largest, most industrial cities in Michigan, now ranks seventh in the state. Sixty percent of the population is African-American; more than 40 percent live below the poverty line. Like Detroit, 60 miles south down Interstate 75, Flint has experienced a massive population decline and an eroded tax base.“Flint is seen as poor and disposable and is largely populated by a demographic that remains voiceless and on the margins,” said Ousley.It’s not just in communities like Flint where poor and marginalized citizens are without voice, it’s in cities, towns and rural areas across the United States. Aside from financial contributions, one way Episcopalians can stand in solidarity with Flint’s residents is to address issues of injustice and inequality in their own communities, said Scheid.“The church has the moral and civil authority to lift those voices up; the church should take care of those issues in its own context,” he said. “That is one way to be responsive to what’s happening in Flint.”Flint’s water crisis laid bare the city’s existing social and economic justice issues, and revealed the impact of citizens being stripped of their democratic rights. At the start of the water crisis, Flint was under emergency management appointed by and reporting directly to the governor, thereby bypassing the authority of locally elected officials. Five Michigan cities (Detroit, Flint, Inkster, Benton Harbor and Highland Park), all with majority African-American populations, have been under emergency management at one time or another.“A further racial justice dimension to address is that at one time state-appointed managers have replaced democratically elected leaders in cities which together are populated by more than half of all African-Americans in the state,” said Ousley-Lynette Wilson is an editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. Tags TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Church considers long-term response to Flint’s water crisis Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit an Event Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Comments are closed. Submit a Press Release Rector Tampa, FL Rector Belleville, IL Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Collierville, TN Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Events This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Smithfield, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest February 22, 2016 at 11:19 pm $100,000 reported as gift to the diocese, yet Bishop Ousley and Diocese disappointedly give a drop in the bucket for the crisis in Flint. By Lynette WilsonPosted Jan 26, 2016 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York January 27, 2016 at 1:39 pm The PETITION-The TRUTHhttp://wh.gov/iwuAmhttp://michigancorruption.simplesite.com/No matter how much $ you give BERNIE MADOFF-you will end up BROKE- Advocacy Peace & Justice Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Bath, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Comments (3) AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Jerome Almon says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group r h lewis (VTS 1963) says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME January 26, 2016 at 7:45 pm 9,000 children, probably damaged for the rest of their lives. That is an unfathomable indication of child abuse. If Bishop Ousley’s claim of falsification of test results is true then there might well be 9 thousand counts of something like “criminal neglect”. Moral laxity seems clear. The witness ofSt Paul’s and St Andrew’s is greatly appreciated. The aid provided thru ER&D is a further piece of Good News. We might all find it an opportunity to share $ by sending a gift to : Bishop Ousley , Diocese of Eastern Mich. , 924 N. Niagara St, Saginaw, MI 48602. (NB Interesting that the office is on Niagara St !) It can buy water and perhaps food for the poor in Flint. RH Lewis Associate Rector Columbus, GA Press Release Service Youth Minister Lorton, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Shreveport, LA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJlast_img read more

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