IAWS profits from growth in food business

first_imgAgri-Food group IAWS has reported a 22.6% increase in pre-tax profits for the six months to the end of January. Group pre-tax profits rose to €49.4 million (£33.9m) on sales up by 13.4% to €715m (£492m).The Delice de France and Cuisine de France owner said growth at its food business was satisfactory, despite a tough market and rising costs. Strong growth was seen in all food markets, particularly in the USA, where IAWS operates businesses including La Brea, IAWS CEO Owen Killiam said in a statement. “The food division is benefiting from its position in growth categories and continued investment in research and development,” he added.Profit in Europe was boosted by the 2004 acquisition of French bakery supplier Groupe Hubert. IAWS Food Europe division recorded sales growth of 23.7% to €421m (£289.6m), while operating profits rose by 39.6% to €33.9m (£23.2m). Its Food USA reported a 24.3% sales rise to €65m (£44.7m), while operating profits increased by 33.4% to €7m (£4.8m).Operating profits within the group’s Agribusiness division fell by by 16.5% to E5.1m (£3.5m) for the six-month period. however, IAWS said approximatel 80% of its profits come through in the second half of the year.last_img read more

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IAWS/Hiestand merger creates global baking firm

first_imgIAWS and Hiestand’s merger, announced earlier this week, will give the company “great scope across four continents”, Hugo Kane, chief operating officer, told British Baker.The merger has created the world’s biggest maker of frozen baked goods. In future, the company will be known as Aryzta, which is derived from the Latin ’Arista’ meaning the pinnacle of an ear of wheat. “Bakery and the world of bakery are at the heart of everything we do,” said Kane, “and the new name is not only at the heart but celebrates it.”IAWS reached agreement with private equity company Lion Capital to buy its 32% share in Hiestand for 12.7 million new shares in IAWS and £24 million in cash. Aryzta will be 83.3% owned by IAWS shareholders, 8.7% owned by Hiestand shareholders and 8% owned by Lion Capital.Last week, the IAWS group reported a 34.7% rise in revenues to £1.5 billion over the nine months to the end of April, and said its new bakery and innovation centre, at Grangecastle, Dublin, was proceeding to plan, following a £107m investment.The name IAWS (Irish Agricultural Wholesale Society) will disappear, but the Swiss ’Hiestand’ will remain as a brand name along with IAWS’s other brands, including Cuisine de France (in-store retail), Delice de France (bakery foodservice), La Brea (artisan breads, North America and UK ) Coup de Pates (patisserie to artisan bakers in France) and Hiestand (croissants, Viennoiserie and breads to Europe, North America and the Far East). The company also owns US cookie-maker Otis Spunk-meyer and 50% of Maidstone Bakeries, which supplies Tim Hortons, a doughnut and fast food chain in North America.Kane said: “IAWS and Hiestand combined have revenues of Euros2.5bn (£1.98bn) and the merger opens out their joint markets across Ireland, England and the North American continent, as well as in France, Germany, Austria, Poland, Switzerland, Turkey, Australia and Japan.”He added: “We have both grown our businesses organically, with a few acquisitions, which is how we expect to continue revenue growth.”IAWS and now Aryzta chief executive Owen Killian said: “Aryzta aims to double per share profit in five years.” IAWS shareholders will receive one Aryzta share for every two IAWS shares. Hiestand investors will get 36 Aryzta shares for each share held.last_img read more

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Tesco bakery boss looks to put customers first

first_imgScott Clarke, Tesco category director of bakery, stressed the retailer’s strategy to put the customer first, at the FoB conference. Coming from a background of bakery at RHM, he said his first five months at Tesco had “felt like a lifetime”. He commented: “It is an industry full of changes and everyone has an emotional response.”He said that Tesco was a grocer at heart and wanted to offer great quality, at a fair price with constant availability. And he added that food pricing was the number one issue for consumers with 27% of them shopping around more, according to recent IGD research.Clarke also noted that plant bread sales were up and that 5.7% more of the population were eating lunchboxes. But he dismissed the idea of labelling in-store bread, stating, “Cus- tomers are not asking for it.”On the issue of salt, he said: “We need to be responsible.” And he commended the breakfast cereals industry for the way it promoted its ’healthy’ attributes and said there was an opportunity for bread to do likewise.l For a fuller report on this talk see feature pages 26-27last_img read more

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Craft brands

first_imgA business’ brand identity can be an important selling tool. It’s what makes you recognisable on the high street and should be what your customers think of when they hear your name. Having said that, you cannot just rely on a pretty logo; your brand identity must work in conjunction with the rest of the business great-tasting products and customer service.Elen Swetman, creative director at brand and design company Brave, says that, with times tough for businesses, the need to be distinguishable and find a unique selling point is no greater than now. The firm has just completed a brand and packaging project for a new artisan bakery in Ireland Cloudberry Bakery (see opposite). It was commissioned to produce a brand direction for the bakery, which would establish its position as a high-end, luxury food retailer. Cloudberry has been selling its products at food markets in Ireland, but hopes to launch in the UK this year and plans to open an outlet in London to rival the likes of upmarket bakery establishments such as Konditor & Cook and Hummingbird Bakery.”A project of this nature would cost around £10,000-£15,000 as it encompasses the creation of a whole brand direction. In our experience, small businesses with strong brands will compete much more successfully in the marketplace and, if they’re backed by experienced brand specialists, who will know how to differentiate, and promote them, they will see a return on their initial investment,” says Swetman.Comprehensive lookAnother craft business that has enlisted the help of a design studio is London-based Euphorium Bakery. Crumpled Dog Design worked with the business to create a new brand identity to coincide with the opening of its shop at 79 Upper Street, Islington in spring 2009. It included work on a logo, packaging, menus, signage and the shops’ interior.Graphic designer Christina Wilkins, who worked on the project, says the importance of a great brand identity for independent bakeries really depends on the location. “A lot of the independents are fighting against the major multiples,” she explains. “To have a strong brand and a presence in these areas is very important. But it’s not necessarily as important in other locations.”When Euphorium found the location at Upper Street it decided it needed a bit of direction in terms of the shopfit and branding. “We contacted a number of firms,” explains Euphorium operations director Andrew Green. “A lot of it was price-driven, but we asked the firms to come up with ideas about where they saw our brand going, and were most impressed with Crumpled Dog.”The project involved weeks of research, including questionnaires filled out by customers, as well as feedback from neighbouring businesses and suppliers. “It’s really important to get the views of everyone involved,” says Wilkins. She admits that projects like these “need to be budgeted for” carefully. The costs vary depending on the number of outlets and scale of the branding, for example. She says it has to be the right idea for your business “it has to fit like a glove” but in Euphorium’s case, the work and cost is paying off. The bakery has seen lots more positive reviews on websites and blogs for example, says Wilkins. The re-brand has even featured in the book The Best of British Design 2010.”When we opened the branch in May 2009, it was a great success and we realised we had found our ideal identity,” says Green. Euphorium has subsequently rolled out the new branding across its seven-shop estate, with its 202 Upper Street outlet its first shop and site of its bakery just in the stages of its refurbishment and branding being completed. “It’s about having a consistent brand message,” says Green. “When you only have one of two shops, like we did for many years your product is your shop window, the quality of our products is what we traded on. However, our aspirations are to keep growing and have more and more shops. You cannot do that with an inconsistent message or a lack of direction.” From a practical point of view, he says. it’s also great to have a template for when you open your next new shop.Glo Creative’s senior designer and creative head, Kerry Mundy-Allen, says that, over the past year, design has focused on celebrating British heritage and vintage style through imagery and typeface. Glo specialises in creating brand identities for companies within the catering industry. “Design has moved away from the modern high-tech look. Gone are the futuristic graphics usually favoured by crisps and other confectionery companies. We’re certainly seeing a faux return to ’basics’ with detailed illustrations and hand-drawn visuals.”Weston-Super-Mare-based family-run bakery Astill & Sons used Glo Creative to develop a fresh new logo and branding, while maintaining its family heritage (see opposite). Owner Oliver Astill was keen to expand the business’ wholesale arm, and felt a rebrand would help the firm compete with established wholesalers in the market. And the new branding has achieved a very positive response from customers. “We have introduced new product lines in conjunction with the rebrand for maximum impact and our sales have increased by 20%. We have even had new orders that have come off the back of it,” says Astill.Clear visionSumming up, Swetman says: “Customer engagement and, more importantly, loyalty, has to be derived from a lot more sources these days. If you’re a small business you might think this is all beyond your reach, and marketing budget. It’s not if you start small, but start with a clear vision of how you can create a business that has the advantage of a good brand direction behind it one that can ultimately create a successful dialogue with customers,” she continues. “A weak brand won’t give you any return on investment. But a great one will ensure you stand out from the crowd and will engage and inspire your customers.” Cloudberry, Ireland With Cloudberry, the firm has tapped into the trend for traditional values, and a return to the bygone era, but with a contemporary feel. “Brave’s involvement with the project has been to create the brand look and feel, to establish the company’s tone of voice, to create the look of the packaging, to create advertisements for press, to design the website and undertake the company’s PR,” says Brave’s Elen Swetman. Astill and Sons, Cornwall “The concept was based around the simplistic 1940s wartime style; the typography is distinctively vintage; combined with a bright, eye-catching red, it completes the retro image,” explains Glo Creative’s Kerry Mundy-Allen. Euphorium, London Euphorium operations director Andrew Green says that, following the opening of its two shops in Belsize Park and Hampstead, the bakery realised it was not happy with the branding it had in place the white, pink and bright blue colour scheme, he describes as being more suitable for a mobile phone shop. Graphic designer Christina Wilkins says colour plays a huge part, especially with food companies, in creating the right environment.last_img read more

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The laws of taste

first_imgJanuary marked a major milestone in flavourings legislation, with the entry into force of a number of new measures resulting from the EU Flavourings Regulation, (EC) No 1334/2008 on flavourings and certain food ingredients with flavouring properties for use in and on foods, adopted in December 2008. This marks the first major change in flavourings legislation since the first European harmonisation exercise under Directive 88/388/EEC which, as the number indicates, has been in force for two decades. And if you think the title sounds cumbersome, read on!So what’s new? Firstly, the scope of the new Regulation is broader than that of Directive 88/388/EEC. There have always been differences in interpretation between European Member States, which has sometimes called into question the concept of single market legislation. Hence Regulation 1334/2008 explicitly sets out that it applies to food ingredients with flavouring properties for example, herbs and spices and to source materials for these ingredients, as well as to flavourings and their source materials. This is important in respect of biologically active principles (BAPs), which are naturally present in many ordinary foodstuffs and in herbs and spices, which are themselves not permitted for use as flavourings substances in the UK. Levels of BAPs are restricted in certain foods considered to be the main contributors of these BAPs to the diet.So for example for coumarin, the BAP in cinnamon and cassia, the general maximum level for most foods was 2 mg/kg. With effect from 20 January 2011, the levels are 50mg/kg in traditional and/or seasonal bakery wares that contain a reference to cinnamon in the labelling; 20 mg/kg in breakfast cereals; and 5mg/kg in desserts. There is no limit in other foods other than the need to meet the general food law requirements.However, the amount of BAPs will differ in cinnamon and you cannot say with certainty that 50mg/kg of coumarin can be obtained from x-amount of cinnamon. As a very rough guide you could say that typically you might find 2mg coumarin in a teaspoon of cinnamon powder, but we would expect a possible variation from ¼ of teaspoon to more than 10 teaspoons.Loss of categoriesThe other significant change in the legislation is the loss of the “nature identical” and artificial categories of flavourings and changes to the requirements for the use and labelling of natural flavourings. Under the new Regulation, natural flavourings have to contain at least 95% of the named origin in order to label the product as containing “natural X flavouring”. The previous industry standard was 90%.Flavourings that are all natural, but contain less than 95% of the named source, have to be labelled “natural X flavouring with other natural flavourings”.Better or not?So is the new legislation an improvement? Such is its complexity that both the producers and users of flavourings have been left with many questions of interpretation. The Food and Drink Federation has been working for several months to develop interpretative guidance to try to make sense of the complex new requirements and to ensure uniform interpretation at European level. This gives examples of the labelling possibilities for the final food, the area which has elicited most queries from food and drink manufacturers, particularly in relation to what may be termed “natural”.The labelling of the source for example strawberry, or lemon/citrus is the issue of most interest, especially for multiple packs and for products in which several flavourings have been used, some of which may be natural and others not. Certainly ingredients lists may be longer, and you can expect customer enquiries as to what is different about the product if they notice the “natural strawberry flavouring with other natural flavourings” designation in the ingredients list.The labelling terms are transferred into the labelling legislation, Directive 2000/13, itself currently under review. Now there’s another saga. Flavour trends In the UK retail market, sweet flavour developments remain focused on natural driven by the retailers along with the need for flavourings with a high impact profile, such as vanilla combinations to add creaminess, toffee and also nut/nut-free flavourings such as hazelnut and almond. Consultant and bakery writer Dan Lepard has been working with bakerybits.co.uk on a range of natural extracts and “nature-identical” flavourings (see left for new definitions). They are packaged in smaller bottles to help the smaller artisan baker who doesn’t want to be lumbered with litres of liquid.Specialist panettone and colomba flavourings are now available from Italy, and this means that making these seasonal sweet yeast dough lines in the UK is much easier. “Interesting flavours, if used carefully and labelled clearly for the customer, can help turn a plain everyday baked good into something rather special,” says Lepard.Another range available to bakers is Unifine’s All Natural Flavours, available in almond, lemon, orange rum (made with Jamaican rum) and vanilla. Each of Unifine’s all natural flavours comes in a 1kg squeezable bottle. The firm also offers nuances of coffee (such as cappuccino) and chocolate; fruit variations including baked apple and even exotic fusions of fruit and cactus. On the savoury side, there has been an increasing amount of activity in speciality breads, says Donna Rose, marketing manager at Synergy. “This can be identified through the cheese-flavoured sharing breads. As this market has increased, so too has the demand for more authentic delivery with impact,” she says. “We have worked closely with manufacturers to develop top-noted yeast extracts such as our Cheese Ultimate (lactic yeast extract, and top note). These can be complemented with our cuisine pastes, which provide the visual and flavour element for speciality breads for example, Italian-style tomato.”When it comes to cheese flavours, there are also opportunities for cost saving using flavourings, adds Dairygold Food Ingredients, which has developed more than 100 cheese powder formulas. Often used to replace hard cheese, they can be used to enhance cheese taste in a range of products including breads and pastries.”Those in the baking industry today are under a lot of pressure to reduce costs and simplify production processes,” says Aidan Fitzsimons, business unit director. “Cheese powders are a more cost-effective and easier-to-use alternative to hard cheeses.”Using spray-drying technology, the ’taste’ powders including cheddar, camembert, emmental, goat’s cheese, blue cheese, gouda can be adapted for price, flavour, functionality and nutritional aspects. How do you flavour the perfect hot cross bun? Some retailers reformulate their hot cross buns every year as consumer taste profiles change over time. Work will begin this month on 2012’s buns. Every year, House of Flavours/NET International benchmarks those in retail. The latest data for 2010 shows that, of the 14 hot cross buns tested, wrapped products, particularly luxury buns, tended to outperform the in-store bakery buns. The luxury varieties benefited from higher and better-quality fruit content and real butter. Marks & Spencer’s Luxury bun came top last year, with Asda’s Extra Special in-store bun coming last from the 14 tested. “Dry” was the most common negative comment across the consumer survey: 50% of the 103 respondents used the word “dry”, compared to less than 30% for “flavour” and “taste”. The buns that performed the worst had the least well-balanced flavour profiles. Of the well-balanced buns, stronger flavoured tended to outperform weaker flavoured. The analysis indicated moistness was most important, ahead of flavour, texture, fruit content and colour.Interestingly, the flavour profile changed after toasting and buttering, which accentuated the sweetness and fruitiness, but depressed the clove. There was no big effect on cinnamon or citrus.”The perfect hot cross bun uses subtle spices combined with a high level of succulent fruit and citrus notes coming from the peel,” says bakery consultant Wayne Caddy. “There’s no point having too much spice in if you’re using citrus peel as it would take over.”So how do you make yours stand out? “If you think of a colour pallete, your primaries are your cinnamon, clove and citrus,” says Mike Speight of House of Flavours. “Using vanilla and almond can modify the profile to make it stand out without being too radical.””For Easter buns, a liquid spice extract added to the dough with a small amount of ground spice will help keep the crumb light and delicate and avoid that yeast slowing effect that a large quantity of dry spice causes,” adds bakery writer Dan Lepard.last_img read more

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Video: Kripsy Kreme 2012 expansion plans

first_imgKrispy Kreme’s hotlight store in Bluewater Shopping Centre has generated around £9m worth of sales since starting in 2004.Rob Hunt, joint managing director, and Lucy Allard, product development manager talked to British Baker the company’s plans to open new stores throughout the UK in the next years, the production process from dough to doughnut and new products and ingredients for 2012.last_img

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Woman accused of running over protesters in Bloomington arrested

first_img Facebook IndianaLocalNews By Jon Zimney – July 10, 2020 0 289 Twitter WhatsApp Facebook Google+ WhatsApp Pinterest Twitter Woman accused of running over protesters in Bloomington arrested Pinterest (Photo supplied/Monroe County Jail) The driver who was seen running over protesters in Bloomington has been arrested.Christi Bennett, 66, was taken into the Monroe County Jail Wednesday night, charged with criminal recklessness and leaving the scene of an accident, according to The Herald Times.She was later released after posting a $500 bond.Bennett was the driver of a red Toyota Corolla that was seen hitting two protesters. A video of the incident went viral on social media shortly after it happened Monday night. One protester suffered cuts and bruises while the other was taken to the hospital with head injuries.Protesters were gathered in front of the Monroe County Courthouse to support Vauhxx Booker, a civil rights activist and member of the Monroe County Human Rights Council who was pinned against a tree by five white men who yelled “white power” and “get a noose.” Video of that incident also went viral on social media. Google+ Previous articleSouth Bend man sentenced to 10 years on drug chargesNext articleConsultant: lagging pay a reason South Bend is challenged at recruiting officers Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney.last_img read more

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Dispensation from Mass extended to November

first_imgCoronavirusIndianaLocalNewsSouth Bend Market (Photo supplied/Fort Wayne-South Bend Catholic Diocese) Catholics around Indiana will be excused from attending mass a bit longer as the state continues to battle to coronavirus.Catholic Bishops around Indiana, including the Diocese of Fort Wayne and South Bend, released a joint statement Monday. It extended the previous dispensation, which had been due to expire later this month, through November 1.The Indiana bishops originally suspended public liturgies on March 18 as a response to the pandemic. Public liturgies resumed in many parts of the state, including the local Diocese, in late May. Google+ By Tommie Lee – August 4, 2020 0 383 Previous articleIndy 500 will happen without fans in the standsNext articleWhitmer issues order to bolster enforcement of state policies Tommie Lee Twitter Twitter WhatsApp Dispensation from Mass extended to November Pinterest Google+ Facebook Facebook WhatsApp Pinterestlast_img read more

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PHM to designate virtual-only grade school teachers

first_imgCoronavirusIndianaLocalNewsSouth Bend Market PHM to designate virtual-only grade school teachers WhatsApp Google+ Google+ Facebook Pinterest Twitter By Carl Stutsman – October 1, 2020 0 309 Twitter Facebook (Source: https://goo.gl/QPWkfT License: https://goo.gl/OOAQfn) PHM Schools have decided to make a change on how elementary students will be taught during the pandemic, from now on virtual-only grade school students will be handled by completely different teachers than those in the classroom.The board earlier this week approved a resolution to specific allocate elementary teachers for the virtual only setting as instructors have been vocal about the difficulties associated with handling the workload of online and in class. The new model will start October 12th.Middle and High School teachers will continue to teach both formats as they continue their hybrid instruction model.Read more here with The South Bend Tribune Pinterest WhatsApp Previous articleGovernor Holcomb extends temporary healthcare licensing for 90 daysNext articleNotre Dame student senate considering resolution asking for Father Jenkins resignation Carl Stutsmanlast_img read more

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