US election results: Biden has won election. What happens now?

first_imgRelated Topics In 2016, President Barack Obama met his successor Donald Trump and their Oval Office photos conveyed how little warmth there was – and remains – between them. Joe Biden has spent months putting together his transition team, raising cash to fund it and last week he launched a website about it. Trump and Obama in Oval Office

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Kamala Harris, elected V.P., has risen higher in national politics than any woman before her.

first_imgBeginning her presidential candidacy with homages to Shirley Chisholm, Ms. Harris was seen as a potential front-runner for the Democratic nomination, but she left the race weeks before any votes were cast. Part of her challenge, especially with the party’s progressive wing, was the difficulty she had reconciling stances she had taken as California’s attorney general with the current mores of her party.As the vice-presidential nominee, Ms. Harris has endeavored to make plain that she supports Mr. Biden’s positions — even if some differ from those she backed during the primary.And although she struggled to attract the very Black voters and women she had hoped would connect with her personal story during her primary bid, she made a concerted effort as Mr. Biden’s running mate to reach out to people of color, some of whom have said they felt represented in national politics for the first time. – Advertisement – A former San Francisco district attorney, Ms. Harris was elected as the first Black woman to serve as California’s attorney general. When she was elected a U.S. senator in 2016, she became only the second Black woman in the chamber’s history. Almost immediately, she made a name for herself in Washington with her withering prosecutorial style in Senate hearings.- Advertisement – It also marks a milestone for a nation in upheaval, grappling with a long history of racial injustice. Over the course of her campaign, Ms. Harris has faced both racist and sexist attacks from conservatives — including President Trump — who have refused to pronounce her name correctly.The daughter of a Jamaican father and Indian mother, Ms. Harris, 56, embodies the future of a country that is growing more racially diverse every year — even if the person whom voters picked for the top of the ticket is a 77-year-old white man. She brought to the race a more vigorous campaign style than that of the president-elect, Joseph R. Biden Jr., including a gift for capturing moments of raw political electricity on the debate stage and elsewhere.center_img Kamala Harris, a senator from California and former presidential candidate, made history when she was elected vice president of the United States.Her victory represents a handful of firsts: She will be the first woman, the first Black woman, the first Indian-American woman and the first daughter of immigrants to be sworn in as vice president.- Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more

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Cramer says stock pop on positive data is right

first_img– Advertisement – News of the vaccine comes amid a surge in Covid-19 cases in the U.S. and abroad. Over the past seven days, the country has reported an average of more than 103,800 new cases as of Saturday, up over 30% compared with a week ago, according to Johns Hopkins.“We came in here thinking that the disease is out of control. There where some states where we just felt like we lost any ability to contain, that there really wasn’t anything we could do,” said Cramer. “People were talking about a national lockdown or local lockdown under a new president, and this may end that.”Pfizer said it plans to submit for emergency use authorization to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration soon after there’s two months of data, which is currently on track for the third week of November.- Advertisement – “This is not a company that’s never brought anything to market. This is one of the greatest companies in the world, I want to point out that the cynicism about science was unrelenting,” Cramer added. “There’s a belief among some people that science was never going to be able to tackle this. That’s wrong, too.”Despite the positive vaccine news, Cramer said struggling Americans still need a second stimulus bill from the federal government.“There’s small and medium sized businesses that are being hurt, and there should be I think some compensation,” said Cramer. “What happens if travel returns, what happens if countries all over the place come back given all the stimulus. Of course they’ll be naysayers, these are probably people that missed the rally. This is a reason for genuine optimism, why don’t we just celebrate it?”“There’s a lot of people who felt growth was going to drop dramatically, and I think that’s going to be off the table and people will have to radically revise their estimates up from next year,” Cramer added.Subscribe to CNBC PRO for exclusive insights and analysis, and live business day programming from around the world. Stocks are surging on news of a 90% effective Covid-19 vaccine, and CNBC’s Jim Cramer said investors should be excited about what the scientific breakthrough means for everyday life and the stock market.“If you think about where we were last week, where we felt that there was very little chance to be able to stop this thing, now suddenly we have hope,” Cramer said on CNBC’s “Squawk Box.”- Advertisement – He spoke after U.S. pharmaceutical giant Pfizer and German biotech firm BioNTech announced that their Covid-19 vaccine was more than 90% effective in preventing Covid-19 during trials. This is more effective than most market participants were expecting, and U.S. equities were poised to soar at the open on Monday. The Dow Jones Industrial Average futures popped 1,600 points or more than 6%.  S&P 500 futures jumped 4.3%.Dr. Scott Gottlieb, a former FDA commissioner, told CNBC the vaccine could be available in limited use as early as late December and widely available by the third quarter of 2021.“I think that the rally is justifiable,” said Cramer. “I think we’re going to start a new discussion, and the discussion is what’s America going to look like post Covid.”- Advertisement –last_img read more

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Senator James Lankford, a Republican, says he would ‘step in’ to make sure Biden receives daily briefings.

first_imgPresident Trump’s refusal to concede has already affected national security issues, as Mr. Lankford’s interviewer noted on the KRMG podcast. It was unclear when and whether Mr. Biden’s team would have access to classified information that would allow them to learn about the threats facing the United States.- Advertisement – – Advertisement – So far, only a small handful of Republican senators have congratulated Mr. Biden on his victory. Senator Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, the majority leader, has backed Mr. Trump, saying he was “100 percent within his rights” to challenge the outcome in court. When asked in his interview about the daily briefings, which contain a compendium of the government’s latest intelligence, Mr. Lankford repeatedly said there was “nothing wrong” with Mr. Biden receiving them so that he could prepare for the transition.Mr. Lankford said he understood why Mr. Biden had begun the transition process, given that major news organizations and television networks had called the race in his favor. But he also added that he believed Mr. Trump was entitled to press forward with his legal challenges because the race was close in several states.As for himself, Mr. Lankford said, “I’m going to wait this out.”- Advertisement –center_img Mr. Lankford, a member of the Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee, said he had already begun “engaging” on the matter. The General Services Administration would soon clear the way for the transition to more formally begin, he said.Emily W. Murphy, the Trump-appointed administrator of the General Services Administration, has the legal authority to begin the transition by formally recognizing Mr. Biden as the incoming president, releasing federal funds, making office space available and allowing Mr. Biden’s team to interact with agency employees across the government. So far, she has refused to grant those permissions on the ground that the results of the election are not clear. Senator James Lankford, an Oklahoma Republican who sits on a key Senate oversight committee, said on a podcast released Wednesday that he had no objections to President-elect Joseph R. Biden Jr. receiving presidential daily briefings, and that he would take action himself if that did not begin by the end of the week.“If that’s not occurring by Friday, I will step in,” Mr. Lankford said in an interview on KRMG radio in Tulsa, Okla., “to be able to push them and say, ‘This needs to occur,’ so that regardless of the outcome of the election, whichever way that it goes, people can be ready for that actual task.”- Advertisement –last_img read more

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Federal Appeals Court Rules That Harvard Does Not Discriminate in Admissions

first_imgIf the Supreme Court chooses to hear the cases involving Harvard and North Carolina, the justices could decide the issue on both constitutional grounds, at a public university, and under civil rights law, at the private one.- Advertisement – A federal appeals court ruled Thursday that Harvard is not violating civil rights law in its admissions, supporting a lower-court ruling that rejected claims that the college was discriminating against Asian-Americans by holding them to a higher standard than other applicants.Students for Fair Admissions, a conservative legal action group representing a number of Asian-American students rejected by Harvard, has vowed to take the case to the Supreme Court, where a strong 6-3 conservative majority is expected to be open to reconsidering 40 years of precedent on affirmative action.- Advertisement – “Our hope is not lost,” said Edward Blum, president of Students for Fair Admissions. “This lawsuit is now on track to go up to the U.S. Supreme Court where we will ask the justices to end these unfair and unconstitutional race-based admissions policies at Harvard and all colleges and universities.”The Harvard case is among several attacking affirmative action that will go forward in the courts even after the Trump administration, which has backed efforts to end race-based admissions policies, leaves office. They include litigation brought by Mr. Blum’s group against the University of North Carolina and the University of Texas. “Today’s decision once again finds that Harvard’s admissions policies are consistent with Supreme Court precedent, and lawfully and appropriately pursue Harvard’s efforts to create a diverse campus that promotes learning and encourages mutual respect and understanding in our community” Rachael Dane, a spokeswoman for Harvard, said. “As we have said time and time again, now is not the time to turn back the clock on diversity and opportunity.” – Advertisement –last_img read more

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ATP Finals: Dominic Thiem defeats Stefanos Tsitsipas in opening match | Tennis News

first_imgDominic Thiem gets revenge over 2019 Nitto ATP Finals champion Stefanos Tsitsipas to make a perfect start in London. The US Open champion moves top of Group London which also contains Rafael Nadal and debutant Andrey Rublev Last Updated: 15/11/20 7:59pm Thiem moves top of Group London with matches against Rafael Nadal and Andrey Rublev to come later this week Thiem moves top of Group London with matches against Rafael Nadal and Andrey Rublev to come later this week

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Adobe Photoshop ARM Beta Version Releasing for macOS, Windows

first_imgWill Apple Silicon Lead to Affordable MacBooks in India? We discussed this on Orbital, our weekly technology podcast, which you can subscribe to via Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or RSS, download the episode, or just hit the play button below. Features such as Camera Raw, healing brush, focus area, auto- blend layers, patch tool, shake reduction, and more, are not present in this beta version, for both macOS and Windows. Importing from Lightroom Photos via the home screen doesn’t work either. Some features are present but with limitations or bugs, such as 3D-related functions, changing stroke pixel size, and filter gallery functions.Adobe noted that several features on the beta version of Photoshop such as select subject, object aware matting, object selection, and preserve details 2.0 upscale were running slower on M1 native devices, but that they will be optimised over time.If the update isn’t available under the beta section in the Creative Cloud Desktop application (considering you have the qualifying ARM hardware), you can look for it manually by clicking on Help > Check for Updates. If this still does not appear, Adobe said that users should try logging out and then log in again to the Creative Cloud Desktop application.- Advertisement – Adobe Photoshop is finally getting an ARM version as the company has started releasing a beta for macOS and Windows. This early version of Photoshop for Apple Silicon will provide many core Photoshop features that can be used by devices that are powered by the Cupertino company’s newly launched M1 chip – such as MacBook Pro 13-inch, MacBook Air, and Mac mini. It will also work with Surface Pro X models that have at least 8GB RAM, and Windows 10 build 19041.488.This will be the first beta release of Photoshop running natively on Apple Silicon and Windows ARM devices. The beta software is not officially supported yet by Adobe. A number of features are not available yet for both macOS and Windows on this version of Photoshop, but Adobe stated that they will be added soon.- Advertisement –center_img – Advertisement –last_img read more

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FLU SERIES Scrambling for vaccine: Colorado official views shortage as temporary

first_img Calonge said he hopes that with roughly 58 million doses of vaccine nationwide, “We should be able to cover, not all those people who need one (shot), but all those people who seek one.” Colorado is using regional public health emergency planners and epidemiologists hired through a bioterrorism grant to collect that data, Parmenter said. Planners in each of 13 regions are surveying vaccine needs as part of their role in bioterrorism emergency response and disease surveillance. CDC recommendations on who should get flu vaccine during the shortagehttp://www.cdc.gov/nip/news/newsltrs/imwrks/2004/200410.htm#topstory Nov 19, 2004 (CIDRAP News) – Before the current influenza vaccine shortage arose, Colorado was vaccinating people in mass clinics. After the shortage hit, the preventive medicine chief for the state’s Kaiser Permanente clinics found himself driving around with leftover vaccine in his car, calling for information on which hospitals needed the doses. “We see them as dual-purpose,” Parmenter said. “It has been very helpful to us.” The planners were completing the needs assessment this week, she said. The state expects to submit an updated vaccine request next week. See also: “Rather than an absolute shortage, this is one of time and place,” he said. But while some states have gone beyond the CDC’s recommendations by excluding healthcare workers or raising the eligible age for vaccine recipients. Colorado has not, Calonge said. As reported in a previous story, he said he has no “scientific basis on which to reprioritize.” Still, Calonge is taking a long view on a shortage that many have called a crisis. “If you’re a long-term care facility, should you immunize the residents or the staff first?” he asked. “If you’re sitting in a long-term care room, the flu isn’t going to climb in the window. Somebody brings it in.” The health department is assessing who still needs vaccine, Calonge said. The supply woes have fostered on-the-ground redistribution among providers, Calonge said. In one case five vials of vaccine, or 50 doses, were moved from one clinic to another. That suggests the magnitude of the shift that Ned Calonge, MD, MPH, chief medical officer for the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE), said he and his staff are overseeing. Calonge said he worried that the doses given out during Colorado’s early flu vaccine clinics could count against the state’s final tally of doses, even though the state can’t ascertain how many high-risk people were vaccinated. Colorado has an estimated 1.1 million to 1.2 million high-risk people. The state had received more than 200,000 doses of vaccine before the shortage emerged, Calonge said, but it’s not clear how many of those vaccinated were in the priority categories listed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta. Nonetheless, officials have kept the vulnerable populations of long-term care facilities in mind. The vaccine issues have prompted far-ranging policy discussions among healthcare leaders in Colorado, and questions linger, Calonge said. In the weeks following the announcement that 48 million doses of vaccine from Chiron Corp. would not be available, the state received about 196,000 doses in the first phase of the CDC-coordinated distribution of remaining supplies. Last week the state got another 66,500 doses, said Cindy Parmenter, communications director for the CDPHE. “It’s a shortage in time and space. I am optimistic that everyone in the priority group who wants a flu shot should be able to get one,” Calonge said in a Nov 10 interview. “Eventually.” Overall, though, he remains optimistic that redistribution will prove effective.last_img read more

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Medical workers would get first pandemic flu shots

first_imgNov 3, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – In the event of an influenza pandemic, medical and public health personnel and workers who make critical vaccines and drugs would have first call on scarce doses of vaccine, under the pandemic plan released by the federal government yesterday.People at high risk for dying of flu rank second among the vaccination priority groups recommended in the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Pandemic Influenza Plan. They are followed by pregnant women, household contacts of certain vulnerable people, public health emergency response workers, and key government leaders.The plan also lists priority groups for treatment with the limited supplies of antiviral drugs that would be available if a pandemic erupted any time soon. First on that list are hospitalized flu patients, followed by healthcare workers who provide direct patient care, including emergency medical service (EMS) providers, and then highest-risk outpatients. Next come pandemic response workers, public safety personnel, certain other outpatients, and nursing home residents.Two committees, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) and the National Vaccine Advisory Committee (NVAC), produced the vaccination recommendations. The NVAC alone produced the recommendations on antiviral treatment.HHS has a stated goal of stockpiling 20 million doses of a vaccine for the H5N1 avian flu virus, the focus of concern about a flu pandemic. Two companies are under contract to make a vaccine for the virus, but how many doses those contracts will yield is unknown because the optimal dose of vaccine has not been determined. The government also hopes to acquire enough doses of antiviral drugs to treat 25% of the population.In making the vaccination recommendations, the two advisory committees assumed that in any given local outbreak during a pandemic, between 25% and 30% of the population will get sick and that 10% of workers will stay home at the peak of the outbreak.Vaccination prioritiesThe vaccine recommendations divide the population into four tiers, with several sets of groups in the top two tiers. The first tier includes the following groups:Priority A: People working in or supporting production of flu vaccines and antiviral drugs (estimated at 40,000), medical and public health workers in direct contact with patients, and vaccinators (estimated at 8 million to 9 million)Priority B (high-risk groups): People older than 64 with one or more high-risk conditions (about 18.2 million), people aged 6 months to 64 years with two or more high-risk conditions (about 6.9 million), and those older than 6 months who were hospitalized for flu or pneumonia within the past year (about 740,000)Priority C: Pregnant women (about 3 million), household contacts of severely immunocompromised people who would not be vaccinated because of likely poor response to vaccine (about 2.7 million), and household contacts of babies younger than 6 months (about 5 million)Priority D: Public health emergency response workers (150,000), and key government leaders managing pandemic responsePriority groups in the second tier are as follows:Priority A: Healthy people older than 64, people aged 6 months to 64 years with one high-risk condition (35.8 million), and healthy children aged 6 to 23 months (5.6 million)Priority B: Other public health emergency responders (300,000); public safety workers and prison staff (2.99 million); essential utility workers (364,000); transportation workers hauling fuel, water, food, and medical supplies, and running public transportation (3.8 million); and essential telecommunications and information technology workersThe third tier includes other key health decision makers in government, plus funeral workers. In the fourth tier is the rest of the population, an estimated 179.3 million.The committees made recommendations only for civilians, though they recognized that military personnel would be a high priority as well, the plan says. The Department of Defense said 1.5 million service members would need vaccination to maintain current combat operations and the military medical system.Not listed among the high-priority groups were patients in skilled nursing homes, who are normally a priority group for vaccination against seasonal flu. Because of a poor immune response to vaccination, they are less likely to benefit from vaccine than other groups that are also at high risk, the plan says. Some studies have suggested that vaccination of health care workers may be a better strategy for protecting nursing home residents, the document says.The plan makes similar points about severely immunocompromised patients, saying vaccination of healthcare workers and household contacts is a better way to protect them.Plan wins qualified praiseThe pandemic plan won qualified praise from various disease and public health experts and groups.Harry Hull, MD, Minnesota state epidemiologist, yesterday called the plan very comprehensive, but cautioned that the nature of such efforts requires constant work to improve preparedness.”The general outline is great,” Hull told CIDRAP News, lauding the emphasis on assisting Asia and stockpiling antivirals.States need to improve infrastructure, including in surveillance, information technology, and isolation and quarantine, and those efforts will cost money, Hull added. In asking Congress for $7.1 billion for pandemic preparedness this week, President Bush called for $100 million for state efforts.”As long as the funding is there it will help us shore up the infrastructure,” he said, but added that those needs are long-term. “How long will [the money] last? Can it be turned into permanent funding?”Hull also noted that practice, not paper, ensures preparedness. “Preparedness is more than running a plan. It’s getting people to work together and act together . . . it’s an ongoing process,” he said.Michael T. Osterholm, PhD, MPH, a leading advocate of pandemic preparedness, called the plan a big improvement over the draft released last year. He particularly praised it for recognizing  the possibility of a pandemic like the disastrous one of 1918.”This draft realizes if we were to experience a 1918-like scenario again, the number of cases and deaths as well as societal impact will be catastrophic,” he told CIDRAP News. “And for that reason we really have no choice but to plan for such a scenario and hope that any future pandemic will have less impact.”Osterholm, director of CIDRAP, publisher of this Web site, also lauded the plan for recognizing “that we need an aggressive and forward-leaning program for vaccines and antivirals,” even though vaccines and drugs would play a very limited role if a pandemic emerged within the next year.He gave HHS “great credit” for making recommendations about rationing of vaccines and antivirals. “I’m not sure it’s exactly what I believe should be the priorities, but I think it’s a very important first step in having that discussion at the state and local level. And it sets a national framework for that.”However, Osterholm cautioned that plans for the use of antiviral drugs may have limited usefulness because no one knows whether the size of dose used against ordinary flu would work against a pandemic strain. “If the doses are going to be different than for H3N2 [seasonal flu], then all this talk about the number of doses is irrelevant,” he said.In addition, he said the plan should offer more detailed guidance for states and local health agencies in some areas. “One of the things we need to do right now is work much more in the area of standards of care, how we are going to do out-of-hospital care. Issues like that are critical and need to be fleshed out much more than they are now.”The National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO) lauded the plan for its comprehensiveness, but voiced “great concern” about inadequate funding for preparation and response.”The Administration’s plan enumerates broad responsibilities for local and state governments in responding to an influenza pandemic. However, earlier this year, the Administration proposed a cut of $130 million in state and local public health preparedness. Although the Administration yesterday proposed an additional $100 million in funding for both state and local pandemic influenza preparedness, this sum does not even offset the previous proposed cut in funding,” NACCHO said in a news release yesterday.Jeffrey Levi, PhD, senior policy adviser for Trust for America’s Health (TFAH), a nonprofit organization whose mission is to protect community health and make disease prevention a national priority, reacted in a news release published Nov 1.Levi praised the administration’s strategy budget request as evidence that pandemic flu is being taken seriously. However, he cited “significant gaps” that need to be addressed. The $100 million budget request doesn’t adequately fund state and local health departments, surge capacity, or risk communication, he asserted.Further, he said the plan lacks substance and detail, particularly in the areas of business operations, transportation and civic life. (In a teleconference on Wednesday, HHS Secretary Mike Leavitt said this plan isn’t meant to cover anything beyond the public health and medical response aspects of a pandemic. He promised that other plans will be forthcoming from other areas of government.)Levi also said it is disturbing that the HHS plan calls for the Department of Homeland Security to lead the response, “essentially divorcing the expertise that will be needed to respond to a complicated health threat from the top chain of leadership.”Staff writer Amy L. Becker contributed to this report.See also:TFAH news releasehttp://healthyamericans.org/newsroom/releases/release110105.pdflast_img read more

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Glaxo says its H5N1 vaccine works at low dose

first_imgJul 26, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – An H5N1 avian influenza vaccine made by GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) triggered a good immune response in human volunteers at a much lower dose than other H5N1 vaccines reported so far, which means that hundreds of millions of doses could be produced by next year, the company announced today.In a clinical trial, 80% of volunteers who received two vaccine doses containing 3.8 mcg of antigen with an adjuvant (a chemical that stimulates the immune system) had a strong immune response, the British-based company said in a news release. A typical dose of seasonal flu vaccine is 15 mcg.”This is the first time such a low dose of H5N1 vaccine has been able to stimulate this level of strong immune response,” GSK Chief Executive Officer J.P. Garnier said in the news release.By comparison, an H5N1 vaccine developed by Sanofi Pasteur induced a good immune response in 67% of volunteers who received two 30-mcg doses with an adjuvant, according to findings reported in May. The US government is stockpiling the Sanofi vaccine.Garnier called the GSK vaccine a breakthrough because, with the effectiveness of the low dose, a given amount of antigen will go much further than it would otherwise.”The meaning of this is that we are going to be in a position, starting later this year, to produce hundreds of millions of doses of an effective pandemic vaccine, so this is a big breakthrough,” Garnier said on BBC Radio, as reported today by Agence France-Presse (AFP).The GSK vaccine was made from an inactivated H5N1 virus collected in Vietnam in 2004, according to Jennifer Armstrong, a GSK spokeswoman in Philadelphia. The vaccine contains a “novel, proprietary adjuvant,” the news release says.The company tested the vaccine on 400 adult Belgians between the ages of 18 and 60, using four different antigen doses, with 3.8 mcg the lowest. Each volunteer received two doses between 3 and 4 weeks apart, Armstrong told CIDRAP News.Investigators measured the level of antibodies the vaccine produced in the volunteers. This was done by assessing hemagglutination inhibition (HI)—the prevention of the clumping of red blood cells, an effect of the presence of antibodies, according to the release.More than 80% of volunteers who received 3.8-mcg doses of vaccine with adjuvant had an HI titer of 40, the level considered protective, GSK reported. A good immune response in 70% of vaccinees is one of three immunogenicity criteria used by European health regulators, according to Armstrong.She said higher doses of vaccine stimulated higher levels of antibodies, but she did not have details on those results. “Our goal is to produce a vaccine that is just immunogenic enough, because we want to protect the maximum number of people,” she said.As for safety, “The vaccine overall was tolerated well, and no serious adverse effects were reported,” Armstrong said. “The reactogenicity with the novel adjuvant was slightly more intense than without it, but it was not considered significant.””There is still a lot more work to be done with this programme, but this validation of our approach provides us with the confidence to continue developing the vaccine, including assessment of its ability to offer cross-protection to variants of the H5N1 strain,” Garnier stated in the release. “All being well, we expect to make regulatory filings for the vaccine in the coming months.”Dr. David Nabarro, the United Nations’ coordinator for avian and pandemic flu, called the GSK findings “a good and exciting piece of science,” according to an Associated Press (AP) report. “But as with all new discoveries, quite a lot of work has now got to be done to establish its place in public health and pandemic preparedness.”Leading virologist Dr. Albert Osterhaus of Erasmus Unversity in the Netherlands also hailed the results as good news, the AP reported. “This is very significant because it shows the principle that this adjuvant might do the job,” he said. “With this adjuvant added to the vaccine, provided the rest of the tests are OK, you could make 10 times as much vaccine.”It is uncertain, however, how effective the vaccine would be against H5N1 strains other than the one it was made from. Osterhaus told the AP, “This vaccine will only give protection against this particular H5N1 strain and possibly other strains.”Garnier said he didn’t know how much the vaccine would cost because the company still has to “industrialize” its production, according to the AFP report. However, he estimated that the price would be roughly 4 British pounds per dose, or about US $7.35, approximately the same as seasonal flu vaccine.When asked if any governments have ordered the vaccine yet, Armstrong said, “We’re in constant dialog with many governments, but the full magnitude of orders from governments is not known.”She said the vaccine, like conventional flu vaccines, is grown in chicken eggs, a process that takes several months.See also:May 12, 2006, CIDRAP News story “Sanofi reports results for H5N1 vaccine with adjuvant”last_img read more

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