Olympia Capital Holdings Limited (OCH.ke) HY2016 Interim Report

first_imgOlympia Capital Holdings Limited (OCH.ke) listed on the Nairobi Securities Exchange under the Industrial holding sector has released it’s 2016 interim results for the half year.For more information about Olympia Capital Holdings Limited (OCH.ke) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Olympia Capital Holdings Limited (OCH.ke) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Olympia Capital Holdings Limited (OCH.ke)  2016 interim results for the half year.Company ProfileOlympia Capital Holdings Limited manufactures and sells products for the home restoration, building and construction sectors in Kenya. Products in its range include floor tiles, PVC windows and door frames, cleaning chemicals, adhesives as well as fire prevention equipment and water pumps sold through its subsidiary, Mather & Platt (Kenya) Limited. Kalahari Floor Tiles is a subsidiary company in Botswana and Tjespro (171) Trading Pty Ltd is a subsidiary company in Cape Town. The company also has interests in real estate including Avon Centre and Heri Heights Limited. Formerly known as Dunlop Kenya Limited, the company changed its name to Olympia Capital Holdings Limited in 2004. Established in 1968, the company was founded to manufacture vinyl floor tiles, adhesives and sports equipment. Olympia Capital Holdings Limited is listed on the Nairobi Securities Exchangelast_img read more

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Backers of Florida’s adopted minimum wage measure brace for legal, legislative…

first_img Please enter your comment! Please enter your name here Florida For A Fair Wage Chairperson John Morgan said Amendment 2, which will raise the state’s minimum wage to $15 an hour, will be his last citizen-initiative campaign, but he stands ready to defend it in court.“The good news is we have a law firm and lots of lawyers, and I would love to take this in front of a jury,” he said.The state constitutional amendment increases Florida’s $8.56 an hour minimum wage to $10 an hour next September and then $1 an hour more each year until it hits $15 an hour in 2026.Amendment 2 received 60.8% of the vote, narrowly securing the 60% majority required to amend the state’s constitution. With its passage, Florida becomes the eighth state to adopt a $15 minimum wage.“[Tuesday] night, the working poor in Florida won in a very, very big way,” Morgan said. “[Tuesday] night, the people of Florida showed their good hearts and compassion.”Morgan, who also spearheaded the measure that legalized medical marijuana in 2016 and boosted 2018’s constitutional amendment that restored most felons’ right to vote, described the initiative as a moral matter, not a political issue.“If you’ve had good fortune and good luck, you are required to share that good fortune and good luck. In this country, there is no greater issue than income inequality,” Morgan tweeted. “Nobody’s going to lose their job.”The trial attorney and his Orlando-based Morgan & Morgan firm and the SEIU Florida labor union contributed nearly all of the $6 million in contributions to support the measure.“I feel like David versus Goliath in my battle here for this amendment,” he said. “All the money and all the time was well worth it last night.”Amendment 2 was opposed by Save Florida Jobs and Amendment 2 Hurts, committees created by the Florida Chamber of Commerce, the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association (FRLA), Associated Industries of Florida (AIF), Americans for Prosperity and other Republican and conservative groups.“Thousands of businesses” in the state will suffer because of Amendment 2, FRLA President and CEO Carol Dover said.“Given the devastating impacts COVID-19 has already had on Florida’s economy, we are extremely worried about the job losses and business closures that will accompany this mandate,” Dover said. “We have seen too many places across the country that have implemented this wage hike, only to see workers who were promised more money instead, lose their jobs altogether.”National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB) Florida Executive Director Bill Herrle said an October analysis showed 20 percent of small businesses may close next year.“Throw it on,” Herrle said, “we’ll see if this breaks the camel’s back.”Morgan criticized Florida Agriculture Commissioner Nikki Fried, Florida’s only statewide-elected Democrat and a candidate for the party’s 2022 gubernatorial nod, for her “weak” and “tepid” support.“If you’re a Democrat in America and you’re on the fence about a living wage, you need to join the other party,” Morgan said. “To me, Nikki Fried has disqualified herself from any future or statewide office in the Democratic Party, and I’m sorry to say that because I really thought she had a bright future.”With Republicans firmly in control of both state legislative chambers, Amendment 2 proponents warily expect GOP lawmakers to introduce enacting legislation meddling with the measure. Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate TAGSAmendment 2BusinessChallengeCourtEmploymentMinimum WageThe Center Square Previous articleApopka joins America Recycles Day this month at Edwards FieldNext articleApopka Wildlife Drive online donation option now available, thanks to repeated requests Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. The Anatomy of Fear Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter By John Haughey | The Center Square Kinoy Miller prepares food at the Love Life Cafe on Thursday, Oct. 29, 2020, in the Wynwood neighborhood of Miami. Lynne Sladky / AP You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address herelast_img read more

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Charities ask for Internet training funds

 18 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Aware of the lack of Internet expertise amongst many criminal justice professionals and social workers, two children’s charities have called on the government to fund Internet training for these groups. They hope such expertise will help them deal more effectively with paedophiles’ use of the Internet to ensnare children.Read Charities call for internet training funds by David Batty at GuardianSociety. About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Charities ask for Internet training funds Howard Lake | 9 January 2001 | News Advertisement AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis read more

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New Chief Executive at FRSB

first_img  36 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 16 January 2009 | News Tagged with: Fundraising Standards Board Law / policy Recruitment / people About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. The Fundraising Standards Board (FRSB) has appointed Alistair McLean as Chief Executive. Formerly Chief Executive at the National Greyhound Racing Club, he has substantial experience of effective self-regulation and dealing with multiple stakeholders including charities.Colin Lloyd, Chairman of the FRSB said: “The Board is confident that with this set of skills, Alistair will build on the foundations laid down by past Chief Executive Jon Scourse and the executive team at the FRSB”.He will take up the post on 2 February.Lindsay Boswell, Chief Executive of the Institute of Fundraising, welcome McLean’s appointment, saying: “It is vital that self-regulation involves a really strong and powerful engagement with fundraising charities, and that this can be achieved without compromise to the independence and integrity of the FRSB. The Institute is committed to helping make the next phase of the FRSB’s development a success.”www.frsb.org.uk AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis New Chief Executive at FRSBlast_img read more

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City Bridge Trust tells charities to use funding where most needed during Covid crisis

first_img About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com. Melanie May | 24 June 2020 | News  426 total views,  3 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis2 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis2 The City of London Corporation’s charitable funder, City Bridge Trust, has told charities that they can use its funding for core day-to-day running costs to help them through the Covid-19 crisis.City Bridge Trust gives grants of over £25 million a year to organisations across the capital, but the cash must usually be used for specific projects. However, due to the current circumstances, it is telling over 400 of its active grantees that they can use up to 12 months of this funding for core day-to-day running costs such as paying staff, renting premises and covering essentials such as energy and phone bills.It is also urging other funders to follow suit and to offer more flexible support to charities and voluntary organisations to help them through the crisis.It has also donated £6 million to the London Community Response and given over £1.7 million in one-off grants to 202 organisations it already supports to help them offset lost income resulting from the coronavirus pandemic.Dhruv Patel, Chairman of the City of London Corporation’s City Bridge Trust Committee, said:“At this time of national crisis, charities and voluntary organisations are needed more than ever, and the selfless work of their volunteers on the frontline is an inspiration to us all. The sudden drop in income experienced across the voluntary sector means many organisations face an existential threat, which has worrying implications for the communities and vulnerable people who rely on their services.“We hope that giving our grantees the choice to direct funding to where they feel it’s most needed will provide a lifeline to help them get through the crisis, and I really hope other funders will consider making the same offer if they can.”Jo Hardy, Head of Services at Gingerbread, which supports single parents and runs groups across London and England and Wales, said: Advertisement “We responded to the pandemic by scaling up our services as quickly as possible while cutting all the costs we could. We didn’t furlough anyone as everyone was needed to support the single parents reaching out to us. All our fundraising efforts are directed towards applying for Covid-19 emergency funds.“We very much welcome this gesture by City Bridge Trust, which helps ease the financial pressures we face and gives us the flexibility to continue to be the solution for single parents to the ongoing impact of the pandemic.”  425 total views,  2 views today Tagged with: COVID-19 Funding City Bridge Trust tells charities to use funding where most needed during Covid crisislast_img read more

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UPS Teamsters 1997 strike

first_imgUnited Parcel Service workers, represented by the Teamsters, are currently in contract negotiations with the company. On June 5, union members voted by a 93 percent margin to strike if an agreement could not be reached. Members could also strike if an agreement between the union negotiating committees and management is voted down. Existing contracts expire on July 31.On July 10 and 12, the Teamsters negotiating committees announced agreements in principle with UPS and UPS Freight on new contracts. Now that the union negotiating team has reached a “handshake deal” with management, the contract offers must be sent to UPS Teamster-represented members for approval, which can take several weeks. Fifty percent plus one of the votes cast must be “yes” to obtain ratification.A “Vote No” momentum has emerged, and is being promoted by the Teamsters United caucus and some union locals because of concessions obtained by management in the announced agreements. The concessions include a 70-hour workweek, poverty wages for part-timers and unlimited subcontracting of work. UPS, now making $6 billion a year in profits, is at present the largest union employer in North America, with about 260,000 Teamster-represented drivers, loaders, unloaders, sorters, clerks and others.The following excerpt, titled “Decades of rank-and-file fight-back,” about the militant UPS strike of 1997 is from Chapter 11 of “Low-Wage Capitalism” by Fred Goldstein (World View Forum, 2008). See more at lowwagecapitalism.com.— WW StaffThe slide in union membership, the decline of wages, and the general deterioration of living conditions for the working class, as well as the increase in racism and national oppression, the wave of anti-immigrant attacks, and all the other setbacks during the last three decades and more, were not inevitable. They were avoidable.The underlying relationship of class forces in U.S. capitalist society was not objectively so unfavorable to the working class that it had no way to overcome the anti-labor offensive. Nor is further decline inevitable, even in the face of capitalist crisis.What has contributed to the feeling of inevitability about the retreat of the labor movement and the workers in general has been the steadfast refusal by the AFL-CIO leadership, including the Change to Win leadership that set up a parallel federation in 2005, to muster the latent power of the workers and the oppressed in a true test of strength with the ruling class.To be sure, there are undoubtedly thousands of local union leaders, delegates, shop stewards, labor council members, as well as rank-and-file militants throughout the labor movement, in every part of the country, who have been straining at the bit to launch a fight-back. Such militancy has manifested itself over and over again in struggles during the 1980s up until the present day. What will revive the labor movement is when these forces are able to multiply, organize, and gain the upper hand.1997: UPS teamsters strikeThe strike against United Parcel Service was a powerful one that fought to reverse concessions, which had begun in 1982. The company had won the right to create a two-tier, part-time system of employment.In August of 1997 the 185,000 members of the UPS division of the Teamsters union waged a 15-day strike that electrified the labor movement and the working class as a whole. Despite compromises made in the final settlement, it was understood, rightly so, as the first major victory for a significant section of the working class after two decades of defeat and retreat.The strike was led by Teamsters President Ron Carey, who had democratized the union during his tenure. It was won by meticulous planning for agenuine class struggle, bringing in the rank-and-file at every stage.The struggle was popular in the union movement and among the working class as a whole because it was projected as a struggle against part-time and low-wage work — not just for UPS workers, but for the working class as a whole. Sixty percent of the 185,000 UPS workers were part-time workers who earned only $9 per hour, as opposed to $19.95 an hour, plus benefits, for full-time workers.The UPS Teamster leadership prepared for the strike for over a year. In formulating their bargaining position, the leadership of the UPS division sent a questionnaire to all 185,000 workers asking for their views on the most important issues. Full-time jobs were the overwhelming priority for the workers. In addition, 10,000 of these workers were receiving part-time pay but were working 35 hours or more a week.The union collected 100,000 signatures on a petition supporting its demands. It distributed the union’s position at workplaces, sports events, and other sites long in advance. It prepared a strong strike apparatus.Once the negotiations were underway, the union sent a video to all UPSshop stewards to keep them up to date. During the strike, the union updated its web site every few hours, faxed bulletins to Teamster locals, and set up a toll-free hotline for strikers.The negotiations were to begin in July of 1997 but rallies were organized around the country beginning in March and continued to multiply up until the strike deadline. Carey had even gone to Germany and France and worked with the UPS unions there to support the strike.The battle-ready rank-and-file winsWhen the UPS rank-and-file marched into battle they were thoroughly unified, highly organized, and prepared for struggle against a ruthless corporate giant with a world empire.The strike was won through a major test of strength between labor and capital. The AFL-CIO leadership supported the strike, and John Sweeney promised to back the Teamsters’ strike benefit fund with $10 million a week.During the strike President Bill Clinton was under pressure — from not only UPS but also Wall Street — to invoke the Taft-Hartley Act. The strength and broad popularity of the UPS workers pushed the Clinton administration back, even though Clinton finally pressured a settlement and leaned on the union to compromise.Nevertheless, the UPS workers forced the company to agree to turn 10,000 part-time workers into full-time employees, won raises for the lower-paid workers, and warded off an attack on pension funding.The ruling-class counter-attacksThe forward momentum of the workers’ struggle arising out of the UPS strike was soon undermined, however. Immediately after the strike, the government framed up Carey on charges of illegally funneling funds to his union election campaign fund. A federal court cleared him of all the charges, but a so-called Independent Review Board got Carey barred for life from running for Teamster office.This board had been set up by the Justice Department in 1989 to oversee the Teamsters. It was headed by William Webster, a former director of both the CIA and the FBI. The Democratic National Committee cooperated with the frame-up, despite the fact that the AFL-CIO leadership, including Carey, had poured hundreds of millions of dollars into getting Clinton elected.Fearing a government attack, the AFL-CIO leadership left Carey to face the frame-up and ouster alone. Instead of standing up and challenging the government to indict the entire top leadership of the union movement, and preparing the rank-and-file to defend the leader who had launched the biggest union challenge to big business in two decades, they abandoned the struggle.The forward momentum gained by the militant mass struggle of 185,000 workers, backed by workers everywhere, soon died down. What the mass struggle had won was diminished by the craven retreat of the leadership.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Indiana Farm Fatalities Continue Downward Trend

first_img Facebook Twitter Home Indiana Agriculture News Indiana Farm Fatalities Continue Downward Trend SHARE Indiana Farm Fatalities Continue Downward Trend Bill FieldEighteen farm-related fatalities were documented in Indiana in 2013, down from 26 the previous year and reflecting a trend of fewer deadly accidents on the farm, a Purdue University report shows. The 2013 Indiana Farm Fatality Summary data show there have been fewer than 30 documented deaths from farm-related accidents each year since 1996. Before then, deaths of well more than 30 people each year were common going back to at least 1970, with two years having at least 50. There also has been a continued decline in the number of farm fatalities involving children and other young people under the age of 21. Only one documented victim in 2013 was under the age of 21, a 15-year-old boy who died when a tractor overturned on him in Elkhart County. “Achieving zero incidents may be an unrealistic goal, but the record clearly shows that something is working and that many tragic incidents have been prevented during the same time as Indiana farmers have become more productive and efficient than at any time in history,” wrote co-authors Bill Field, Purdue Extension safety specialist, and agricultural and biological engineering graduate research assistant Yuan-Hsin Cheng.Contributing to fewer fatalities, the authors said, are a decline in the number of Indiana residents who live and work on farms; advancements in the safety, durability and productivity of agricultural equipment; reduced dependency on youth labor; increasing expectations for safer and healthier workplaces; and continued efforts to increase awareness of the importance of managing risks in agriculture.Advancements in medical care, including that provided by emergency services, also have contributed to lower fatality rates by increasing the probability of victims surviving injuries that once were deadly, according to the report. The authors said the fatalities count, compiled by the Purdue University Agricultural Safety and Health Program, might not be comprehensive because of the lack of consistent reporting requirements, Indiana residents dying at medical facilities in neighboring states, and victims dying from related medical complications well after an accident. The count was tallied through a variety of sources, including news reports, Web searches, voluntary reporting from Purdue Extension educators and individuals, and personal interviews.Accidents were documented in the following counties in 2013: Bartholomew (2), Dearborn, Dubois, Elkhart, Fountain, Franklin, Fulton, Hancock, Hendricks, Howard, Koskiusko, Lake, LaPorte (2), Lawrence, Marshall and Posey. Accidents included suffocation in a grain bin; falling from a tractor and a concrete silo; an overturned mower, tractor and all-terrain vehicle; and being struck by farm equipment, among other causes. There were three instances in which victims died from being hit by a falling tree. The age of the victims ranged from 15 to 78 and averaged 61.4. All were males.The authors noted a “dramatic decline” in the number of children and young adults reported as dying in agricultural workplaces. There have been only three reported deaths of people under the age of 18 in the past three years, the lowest number of such victims in a three-year period since at least beginning in 1994.  “It is believed that the changing expectations of parents and the general public toward having children and youth employed in some types of farm work, considered especially hazardous, has had a significant influence on the declining trend in fatalities involving this group,” the authors said. “The introduction of larger, more complex and expensive equipment has also made many producers less comfortable using inexperienced workers to operate it.”The full report is available at www.farmsafety.org Facebook Twitter SHARE Previous articleIndiana Farmers Help Alliance to Increase College Aggies Online ScholarshipsNext articleFinally a farmer’s prospective on climate change Gary Truitt By Gary Truitt – Sep 24, 2014 last_img read more

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Open carry guide: where you can and can’t open carry in the 109

first_imgTwitter Breakdown: Cambridge Analytica, information warfare CRES negotiates move to interdisciplinary unit amid student resistance Abortion access threatened as restrictive bills make their way through Texas Legislature Elizabeth Campbellhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/elizabeth-campbell/ Grains to grocery: One bread maker brings together farmers and artisans at locally-sourced store Elizabeth Campbell Elizabeth Campbellhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/elizabeth-campbell/ printAs residents adjust to the open carry law which went into effect Jan 1., local businesses are deciding if they will permit open carrying of guns in their establishments.Check out the map below for a list of which local businesses are permitting open carry and which aren’t around the 76109 ZIP code.The open carry law allows Texas residents with concealed hand gun permits to now openly carry their firearms in a shoulder or hip holster. The law also allows business to decide if they will be allowing open carry on a case by case basis.According to the Chapter 30.07 of the Texas Penal Code, establishments that wish to restrict open carry must post a sign at any entrance to the building that states a person may not enter the property with a gun that is openly carried. That message must also be posted in contrasting colors using block letters at least an inch tall in both English and Spanish, according to the code.They can also prohibit handguns that are concealed; however, they must post a second sign that specifically prohibits concealed carry.Many businesses haven’t posted signs outside their businesses yet, but they have the ability to verbally tell customers that open carry isn’t permitted. Previous articleThe Skiff: January 14, 2016Next articleStudent Development hosts annual organizations fair Elizabeth Campbell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR WATCH: Former Chief of Staff for Obama talks Trump administration, Democrats, liberal arts education Elizabeth Campbellhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/elizabeth-campbell/ Elizabeth Campbellhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/elizabeth-campbell/center_img ReddIt Linkedin Alumna joins ‘Survivor’ reality show in quest for a million dollars Facebook Twitter ReddIt Elizabeth Campbell is executive editor of TCU 360 and a senior journalism and political science double major. When not in the newsroom, she’s thinking about the news while probably watching TCU football or being a history nerd. Send her a tip if you have a story to share! + posts Facebook Linkedin Fort Worth set to elect first new mayor in 10 years Saturdaylast_img read more

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TCU offers allergy-free dining options

first_imgMadison Goforth is a Senior journalism major from Tyler, Texas. Twitter The Leap: unique restaurants that take Frog Bucks ReddIt Facebook Three-star D-End Izaih Filikitonga signs with TCU football for fall season Army ROTC spends weekend practicing tactical missions World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution Photo courtesy of TCU dining services. Welcome TCU Class of 2025 Facebook Madison Goforthhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/madison-goforth/ Previous articleTCU Retirees’ Association explores the past of a serial killer from 1885Next articleKaleo attendees reflect on their summer Madison Goforth RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Madison Goforthhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/madison-goforth/ Student finds joy in volunteering for ‘miracle’ baseball league Madison Goforthhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/madison-goforth/ Twitter + posts Linkedin Madison Goforth ReddIt printThere’s a new option on campus for students with food allergies or those looking to follow an allergen-free diet.Magnolia’s in the King Family Commons Building (KFCB) doesn’t cook with soy, gluten, dairy, egg, tree nuts, peanuts or shellfish.All the restaurants in the KFCB are scratch kitchens, said Monica Luna, retail manager at King Family Commons Building. She said bringing in fresh ingredients every day makes cooking allergen-free much easier.Zero Seven AllergensVenngage InfographicsMia Solheim, a sophomore living in nearby Marion Hall, welcomed the change. “Being gluten-free has been hard in the past to have a good variety in my diet, but now Magnolia’s makes it a lot easier and more enjoyable,” she said.Craig Allen, the director of housing and residence life, said Magnolia’s is the best place for this conversion because of its self-contained kitchen.“Students can be confident about avoiding any cross contamination and be sure they are safe to here,” he said.Over the years the concern for gluten free, dairy free and other allergen free dining options has been growing, Allen said. More than 15 million people in the U.S. have food allergies. Others are allergen-free by choice.Monica Luna, retail manager at King Family Commons Building, said the kitchen has its own unique staff and is starting from ground zero.“This summer was a lot of studying,” she said. “We went to the grocery stores and read a lot of labels, we did a lot of research and we talked to a lot of students and their mothers.“It was fun to learn how to make meals with different substitutes,” Luna said. “It is a process learning to make a dairy-free macaroni and cheese, but when we hear the students’ positive reactions it is all worth it.”Miranda Ross, a committee member on the Student Government Association dining committee said, “for people like me who actually have allergen needs, it is the coolest place on campus to eat now.”To learn more about Magnolia’s and other allergen free dining options on campus, go to tcu.sodexomyway.com.  Madison Goforthhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/madison-goforth/ TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history Linkedinlast_img read more

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North Nicosia court urged to uphold acquittal of two journalists

first_img Turkey demands “patriotic” coverage of military offensive in Syria Northern Cyprus is ranked 74th out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2019 World Press Freedom Index. Reporters Without Borders (RSF) calls on a North Nicosia higher court to confirm theacquittal of two newspaper journalists in Turkish-recognized Northern Cyprus who werefacing up to five years in prison if convicted of insulting and defaming Turkish PresidentRecep Tayyip Erdoğan. Court in northern part of Cyprus urged to acquit two journalists of insulting Erdoğan April 20, 2019 Find out more October 29, 2019 North Nicosia court urged to uphold acquittal of two journalists The case was brought against them after a cartoon showing a Greek statue urinating on Erdoğan’s head was published in their newspaper and on social media. Help by sharing this information News Şener Levent, the editor of the North Nicosia-based daily Afrika, and Ali Osman Tabak, one of his journalists, were acquitted in April 2019 on charges with defaming and insulting a foreign leader and “inciting hatred against a foreign leader with the aim of spoiling the friendly and peaceful relations between the two countries.” Şener Levent and Ali Osman Tabak Pressure has been growing on journalists of late with regard to their coverage of Turkey and its policies towards Cyprus. Some have received “warnings” from Turkish officials and some censor themselves because they fear a crackdown on the media similar to what has happened in Turkey. RSF_en center_img Northern CyprusEurope – Central Asia Protecting journalistsMedia independence Judicial harassment Northern CyprusEurope – Central Asia Protecting journalistsMedia independence Judicial harassment Follow the news on Northern Cyprus Organisation “We urge the North Nicosia high court to confirm the acquittal, which was the subject of an appeal by the attorney-general’s office on 25 May,” said Pauline Adès-Mével, the head of RSF’s European Union and Balkans desk. “Convicting the two journalists would be a grave error and would send an extremely negative signal to the media in the northern part of Cyprus.” News Adès-Mével added: “At a time when Ankara is maintaining an enormous amount of pressure on the Turkish media, and the Turkish Cypriot media are being harassed more and more, we call on the northern part of Cyprus to shake off this domination and to assert its independence.” Receive email alerts News to go further January 23, 2018 Find out morelast_img read more

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