AngloGold Ashanti Limited (AGA.gh) 2020 Presentation

first_imgAngloGold Ashanti Limited (AGA.gh) listed on the Ghana Stock Exchange under the Mining sector has released it’s 2020 presentation For more information about AngloGold Ashanti Limited (AGA.gh) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the AngloGold Ashanti Limited (AGA.gh) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: AngloGold Ashanti Limited (AGA.gh)  2020 presentation Company ProfileAngloGold Ashanti Limited is a global mining company with extensive interests in the Americas, Continental Africa, South Africa and Australasia. It boasts a portfolio of 17 operations and 3 projects in 10 countries, including long-life, relatively low-cost operating assets with differing ore body types located in key gold-producing regions. The company was formed in 2004 through the merger of AngloGold and the Ashanti Goldfields Corporation. There are seven mines in the Continental Africa region, of which 6 are operational. In Ghana, the company has two mines; Iduapriem and Obuasi. AngloGold Ashanti Limited is the third-largest gold mining company in the world, measured by production. In addition to its mining operations, it has established several exploration programmes in regions around the world. AngloGold Ashanti Limited is listed on the Ghana Stock Exchangelast_img read more

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Church considers long-term response to Flint’s water crisis

first_img Selena Smith says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopalians were challenged to bring water to the Diocesan Convention’s closing Eucharist at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in downtown Flint, Michigan, in October 2015. Photo: Diocese of Eastern Michigan.[Episcopal News Service] Churches and other community-based organizations responded first, providing Flint residents with bottled water and filters for their taps long before Michigan officials acknowledged people were drinking lead-contaminated water.Over the last two weeks, Flint’s water crisis and the state’s failure to respond, have dominated mainstream headlines, with President Barack Obama declaring a “state of emergency,” and last week Governor Rick Snyder using his State of the State address to apologize to Flint residents.It was the persistence of community groups, like Water You Fighting For and Concerned Pastors for Social Action, who organized protests, press conferences and publicity for more than a year and a half, that brought the crisis to the attention of local and state officials, explained the Rev. Dan Scheid, rector of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church.“This is a social-justice issue. The poor and marginalized simply were not listened to by those in power, they were repeatedly told the water is fine, the water is fine, and at some point they realized that the water wasn’t good and it’s going to take additional reporting and digging to find out who knew what when,” he said. “October 1st [2015] is when the governor said he knew, and that’s when things started to change.”In April 2014, under the leadership of an emergency manager and in an effort to save $5 million, the city’s water supply was switched from Lake Huron via Detroit’s municipal water system to the Flint River, a more corrosive source that caused lead leaching from aging pipe infrastructure to contaminate resident’s water. (The city of Detroit has had its own water issues.)The water also didn’t meet U.S. Environmental Protection Agency standards for carcinogens associated with industrial pollution, explained Eastern Michigan Bishop Todd Ousley, whose diocese includes Flint.“Furthermore,” he said. “There is evidence of falsification of water tests, withholding of test information, and coercion of state and local officials to ignore disturbing water test results.”Earlier this month, the regional EPA official resigned over the crisis.Almost immediately following the switch, residents began to complain about the water’s color, taste and smell, and the skin irritation caused by bathing in it, yet government officials maintained the water’s safety. It was the efforts of community leaders and pastors, who spoke up for the city’s majority black and impoverished residents, that caught the attention of physicians and academics who conducted studies countering the government’s claims. Of the city’s 100,000 residents, 9,000 are children under age 6, the population most vulnerable to the cognitive and developmental delays associated with lead poisoning.“As for the long-term health, educational and psychological effects on the generation of babies, toddlers and preschoolers, we don’t know what that will look like, how will that be measured and attended to,” said Scheid.Scheid became the rector of St. Paul’s in May of 2015, after serving as rector of St. Augustine of Canterbury in Benton Harbor, another Michigan city that has been under emergency management.Before state officials acknowledged the public health crisis and deployed the National Guard door-to-door handing out bottled water, filters and testing kits, community-based organizations and churches stepped up.St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in downtown Flint served as a water distribution point, and with grant assistance from the dioceses of Eastern and Western Michigan and donations from parishes across lower Michigan, partnered with the Food Bank of Eastern Michigan, the soup kitchen at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, on the city’s east side, the north side’s Christ Enrichment Center and other organizations to make sure the city’s residents had access to clean water.With a $5,000 grant from Episcopal Relief & Development, St. Paul’s, channeling the money through the United Way, was able to replace water filters in schools, reaching 25 percent of the student population.Moving forward, one of the ways churches and other community-based organizations are looking to respond to residents’ needs is by making sure they have access to healthy, fresh foods. Evidence has shown that foods rich in iron and vitamin C can ameliorate the effects of lead poisoning, said Scheid.“The issue is that much of the food that comes through the food bank, fresh stuff, is on the verge of spoiling and getting appropriate food from the food bank is a challenge,” said Scheid, adding that Flint is a food desert. “This is something we are looking at, could we do something to address nutrition in a meaningful way, could we purchase top quality food for distribution to families.”Another long-term issue is addressing residents’ spiritual and psychological needs.“The trauma, the fear and the anger of the adults, parents and grandparents, knowing that you may have given your children contaminated water for months and months and the associated guilt,” said Scheid.With a population less than 100,000, Flint, once one of the largest, most industrial cities in Michigan, now ranks seventh in the state. Sixty percent of the population is African-American; more than 40 percent live below the poverty line. Like Detroit, 60 miles south down Interstate 75, Flint has experienced a massive population decline and an eroded tax base.“Flint is seen as poor and disposable and is largely populated by a demographic that remains voiceless and on the margins,” said Ousley.It’s not just in communities like Flint where poor and marginalized citizens are without voice, it’s in cities, towns and rural areas across the United States. Aside from financial contributions, one way Episcopalians can stand in solidarity with Flint’s residents is to address issues of injustice and inequality in their own communities, said Scheid.“The church has the moral and civil authority to lift those voices up; the church should take care of those issues in its own context,” he said. “That is one way to be responsive to what’s happening in Flint.”Flint’s water crisis laid bare the city’s existing social and economic justice issues, and revealed the impact of citizens being stripped of their democratic rights. At the start of the water crisis, Flint was under emergency management appointed by and reporting directly to the governor, thereby bypassing the authority of locally elected officials. Five Michigan cities (Detroit, Flint, Inkster, Benton Harbor and Highland Park), all with majority African-American populations, have been under emergency management at one time or another.“A further racial justice dimension to address is that at one time state-appointed managers have replaced democratically elected leaders in cities which together are populated by more than half of all African-Americans in the state,” said Ousley-Lynette Wilson is an editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. Tags TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Church considers long-term response to Flint’s water crisis Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit an Event Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Comments are closed. Submit a Press Release Rector Tampa, FL Rector Belleville, IL Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Collierville, TN Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Events This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Smithfield, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest February 22, 2016 at 11:19 pm $100,000 reported as gift to the diocese, yet Bishop Ousley and Diocese disappointedly give a drop in the bucket for the crisis in Flint. By Lynette WilsonPosted Jan 26, 2016 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York January 27, 2016 at 1:39 pm The PETITION-The TRUTHhttp://wh.gov/iwuAmhttp://michigancorruption.simplesite.com/No matter how much $ you give BERNIE MADOFF-you will end up BROKE- Advocacy Peace & Justice Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Bath, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Comments (3) AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Jerome Almon says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group r h lewis (VTS 1963) says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME January 26, 2016 at 7:45 pm 9,000 children, probably damaged for the rest of their lives. That is an unfathomable indication of child abuse. If Bishop Ousley’s claim of falsification of test results is true then there might well be 9 thousand counts of something like “criminal neglect”. Moral laxity seems clear. The witness ofSt Paul’s and St Andrew’s is greatly appreciated. The aid provided thru ER&D is a further piece of Good News. We might all find it an opportunity to share $ by sending a gift to : Bishop Ousley , Diocese of Eastern Mich. , 924 N. Niagara St, Saginaw, MI 48602. (NB Interesting that the office is on Niagara St !) It can buy water and perhaps food for the poor in Flint. RH Lewis Associate Rector Columbus, GA Press Release Service Youth Minister Lorton, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Shreveport, LA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJlast_img read more

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Waccabuc House / Chan-li Lin AIA + Rafael Viñoly Architects PC

first_imgSave this picture!© Brad Feinknopf+ 27 Share Waccabuc House / Chan-li Lin AIA + Rafael Viñoly Architects PCSave this projectSaveWaccabuc House / Chan-li Lin AIA + Rafael Viñoly Architects PC United States CopyHouses•Waccabuc, United States “COPY” Architects: Chan-li Lin AIA, Rafael Viñoly Architects PC Year Completion year of this architecture project Photographs ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/216210/waccabuc-house-chan-li-lin Clipboard Year:  Projectscenter_img “COPY” Waccabuc House / Chan-li Lin AIA + Rafael Viñoly Architects PC 2011 ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/216210/waccabuc-house-chan-li-lin Clipboard Houses Photographs:  Brad Feinknopf Text description provided by the architects. The rocks and trees on the 3.25-acre site were the inspiration for this house, located on the top of a hill at the end of a 1,000 foot-long dirt road. The house replaced an abandoned one-story structure whose origins dated to 1954. Being able to climb onto the roof of that structure is what convinced the architects that the majority of living spaces should float one-story above the ground. A veritable tree-house, it enjoys the best of what the site has to offer—trees, views, and light. Save this picture!© Brad FeinknopfBuilding within the small footprint of the original structure and elevating and cantilevering the larger second floor proved advantageous, minimizing both the site disturbance as well as the development costs. No trees were removed and the existing drive, site walls, well and septic systems were reused. The second floor structure is a pair of lightweight floor-height steel trusses supported on six columns pinned to the rock ledge below. The cantilevered ends extend twenty feet beyond the supports, forming a carport to the east and a covered porch to the west. The first floor is nestled into the existing rock outcroppings and site contours and was constructed using conventional 2×6 wood framing. Save this picture!© Brad FeinknopfThe house is situated east-west, with most living spaces enjoying maximum daylight via strategically placed ventilating aluminum windows and south, east and west-oriented aluminum window walls, providing a variety of exposures and views. The second-floor cantilevers provide shade for the first floor. Horizontal brows and shade trees to the west protect the second-floor window walls from rain and summer solar-gain, but allow the lower winter sun to penetrate deep into the house in the winter. Artificial lighting is indirect, emphasizing the structure: the white stucco soffits of the cantilevers and entrance canopy and the sloped wood ceiling of the main living space. Save this picture!ground floor planThe polished concrete floors on both floors have radiant heat pipes embedded in the structure, providing the primary source of heat. Energy-efficient heat pumps provide supplemental heat and air-conditioning on rare occasions. Spray-foam insulation was used on all perimeter walls, at the roof and between the first and second floors to maximize the thermal efficiency of the structure.Save this picture!© Brad FeinknopfProject gallerySee allShow lessSkyVille @ Dawson / WOHAArticlesMasterplan for Mönchengladbach / Grimshaw ArchitectsArticles Share ArchDaily CopyAbout this officeChan-li Lin AIAOfficeFollowRafael Viñoly Architects PCOfficeFollowProductWood#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesWaccabucHousesUnited StatesPublished on March 13, 2012Cite: “Waccabuc House / Chan-li Lin AIA + Rafael Viñoly Architects PC” 13 Mar 2012. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogAluminium CompositesTechnowoodWood Siding in KSR Villa BodrumGlassMitrexSolar GreenhouseMetal PanelsAurubisMill Finished Copper: Nordic StandardBedsFlorenseBed – UpholsteredSignage / Display SystemsGoppionDisplay Case – Qd-ClassMetal PanelsTrimoMetal Panel Finishes – ArtMeSkylightsLAMILUXRooflight F100 CircularWire MeshGKD Metal FabricsMetal Fabric in TransportationSystems / Prefabricated PanelsInvestwoodCement-Bonded Particle Board – Viroc NatureMetal PanelsRHEINZINKSeam Systems – Flatlock TilesSofasMenuDining Bench – EaveTablesArtisanCoffee Table – BloopMore products »Read commentsSave想阅读文章的中文版本吗?Waccabuc住宅 / Chan-li Lin AIA + Rafael Viñoly Architects PC是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img read more

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Indiana Pork Honors Award Winners

first_img Previous articleVilsack Confirmed by U.S. Senate to Return to Former Post at USDA, Ag Industry ReactsNext articleVilsack is Back at USDA, Indiana’s Braun Reacts Eric Pfeiffer Indiana Pork Honors Award Winners Home Indiana Agriculture News Indiana Pork Honors Award Winners SHARE SHARE Indiana pig farmer Heather Hill, former Indiana Farm Bureau staffer Justin Schneider, and contract grower Daryn Cordes were all recently honored by Indiana Pork.Heather Hill was the recipient of the Producer Meritorious Service Award. She is co-owner of Hill Farms in Greenfield, Indiana, a 600-sow farrow-to-finish operation, with her husband Marc and his parents. Hill Farms also grows corn, soybeans and wheat. Heather is a former president of the Indiana Pork Board and has been actively involved since 2009. She also serves on the National FFA Career Development Sales Committee and is a leader for the local 4-H chapter. Heather is an Operation Main Street speaker.Indiana Pork awarded its Industry Meritorious Service award to Justin Schneider. In over 15 years at Indiana Farm Bureau, Justin worked on air, water and other environmental issues for ag and was trusted on those issues by legislators. He led the effort to transition from NPDES permitting to state permitting for CAFOs. He worked on several right to farm law issues both at the Indiana Statehouse and as a resource for litigators. During his time at Indiana Farm Bureau, Justin was a policy expert that was motivated to ensure commercial agriculture thrived in Indiana. Justin grew up on a hog farm and his family still raises corn and soybeans.Daryn Cordes of Wabash County received the Contract Grower award. Daryn has contract grown hogs for Dykhuis Farms for over 13 years. As a young man he built two brand new facilities for DFI. He has 8625 wean to finish spaces for DFI located in Roann IN. He is married and a father of two daughters. His entire family is involved in day-to-day animal care and activities around the farm. Daryn is also a volunteer fire fighter for the Roann Fire Department.Indiana Pork also recognized retiring board member Marshall Martin of Purdue University. Nick Maple, a hog farmer from Amboy, was recognized as outgoing Indiana Pork President and Jeff Rodibaugh was honored as outgoing INPAC chairman. Maple will serve one more year on the board as Past President and Rodibaugh joined the Indiana Pork board as a member. New members to the board include Matt Paschen, farrow to finish hog farmers in Cass County, and Dale Schmitz, an area buyer for Weichman Pig Company in southern Indiana. By Eric Pfeiffer – Feb 23, 2021 Facebook Twitter Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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Keen takes the stage at Wagner Noël

first_img Facebook By admin – March 16, 2018 Lorra Johnson points to a sensory icon on a smart board during elementary primary class in the new Bynum School in Midland. Presented jointly by the university and The Association of Former Students, this award recognizes Aggies who have achieved excellence in their chosen professions and made meaningful contributions to Texas A&M University and their local communities.A Texas Heritage Songwriters Hall of Fame inductee and BMI Troubadour Award recipient, he works with Texas charities and returned to A&M to give fundraising concerts for Bonfire victims and Hurricane Harvey relief. Keen learned of the honor March 3 in a surprise announcement at a benefit concert in Helotes, Texas.Keen recently told Forbes magazine that he enjoys his time on stage.“My two hours on stage are the best part of my days on tour,” Keen said in the recent Forbes article. He got his start knocking around Texas, and worked hard to get his first album released. “I persevered to get that Philo album deal. It was more like a workshop, and the label liked it so much the album was moved to its better known Rounder imprint.”If You Go Pinterest Twitter Event infoRobert Earl Keen homepageRobert Earl Keen will perform at the Wagner Noël Performing Arts Center at 8 p.m. March 23. Tickets are available now.One of the pioneers of the live music scene in Texas, Keen is the inaugural recipient of BMI’s Troubadour Award, which honors songwriters. The Houston native has been recording for more than three decades, beginning with 1984’s “No Kinda Dancer.”His signature song, “The Road Goes on Forever,” was the title track for a 1995 album by The Highwaymen (Johnny Cash, Waylon Jennings, Kris Kristofferson and Willie Nelson). He will tour with Nelson this spring.Keen was recently awarded with The Distinguished Alumnus Award, which is the highest honor bestowed upon a former student of Texas A&M University, awarded since 1962 to only 276 of Texas A&M’s 477,000 former students. WhatsApp Virgin Coco MojitoFruit Salad to Die ForCreamy Fruit SaladPowered By 10 Sec Mama’s Deviled Eggs NextStay What: Robert Earl Keen in concert.When: 8 p.m. March 23.Where: Wagner Noël Performing Arts Center.Tickets: wagnernoel.com Local NewsEntertainment Keen takes the stage at Wagner Noël Pinterest 1 of 2 Facebook Previous articleCommunication in Marriage SeminarNext articleGarden Explorers: Spring planting admin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Country crooner featured at Rolling 7’s Home Local News Entertainment Keen takes the stage at Wagner Noël WhatsApp Wagner Noel Logo USE THIS ONE Erica Lane part of Fandango celebration Midessa Music Fest is in July Robert Earl Keen 2016 Twitterlast_img read more

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Five things you need to know today, April 26

first_img Twitter Take a look at the news in and around Odessa on Thursday, April 26. Find complete local news coverage in the Odessa American every day, online at oaoa.com and our daily E-Edition at myoaoa.com.1. A close friend of the man found dead in an RV Tuesday said the bees had been living in a storage tank underneath the trailer for 15 years.2. Since January, the Odessa Police Department has worked with its 10 newest recruits, preparing them to be sworn in as police officers when they graduate July 27.3. In line with the namesakes of Wilson & Young Medal of Honor Middle School, Principal Yolanda Garza said she hopes to implement a character education program recently introduced at the campus.4. A pair of operas will be staged at Odessa College starting tonight at the Globe Theater —“Sister Angelica” and “Gianni Schicchi.”5. IN SPORTS: The Odessa High softball team (21-6-1) will take on the El Paso Socorro Bulldogs in a Class 6A bi-district best-of-3 series. Game 1 is slated for 7 p.m. Friday at Pecos High School, while Game 2 will be at 11 a.m. Saturday. If necessary, Game 3 is at 1 p.m. Local News Five things you need to know today, April 26 By admin – April 26, 2018 Facebook Pinterest Previous articleSULLUM: Trump wages war wherever and whenever he wantsNext articleDAILY OIL PRICE: April 26 admin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR WhatsApp Cast of Gianni Schicci. ECISD undergoing ‘equity audit’ center_img Pinterest Home Local News Five things you need to know today, April 26 Twitter WhatsApp OC employee of the year always learning 2021 SCHOOL HONORS: Permian High School Facebook Foolproof Roasted Pork TenderloinUpside Down Blueberry Pie CheesecakeHawaiian Roll Ham SlidersPowered By 10 Sec Mama’s Deviled Eggs NextStay last_img read more

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JBL® Announces 2021 Athlete Ambassador Roster, Expanding its Relationship with the NBA and Celebrating…

first_imgLocal NewsBusiness Pinterest By Digital AIM Web Support – April 6, 2021 TAGS  Facebook Previous articleZoetis to Participate in the Cowen 41st Annual Health Care ConferenceNext articleGlobal e-Pharmacy Market to 2025 – Featuring Alto, Blink Health and CVS Health Among Others – ResearchAndMarkets.com Digital AIM Web Support Twitter Pinterestcenter_img WhatsApp Facebook Twitter JBL® Announces 2021 Athlete Ambassador Roster, Expanding its Relationship with the NBA and Celebrating its New WNBA Ambassador Candace Parker WhatsApp JBL® Announces 2021 Athlete Ambassador Roster, Expanding its Relationship with the NBA and Celebrating its New WNBA Ambassador Candace Parkerlast_img read more

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Virtual AVID celebration coming up

first_img Pinterest Twitter By Ruth Campbell – May 13, 2021 Previous articleFallen Officer Memorial ServiceNext articleCity strikes out again in public records legal fight against the Odessa American Ruth Campbell EducationECISD Pinterest Facebook Facebook AVID students Madison Elliot, Abigail Anderson, Amaya Villanueva and Mackenzie Vlosich show their painted hands as they work on their Senior Experience. (Courtesy Photo) Ector County ISD’s AVID celebration will be virtual again with a video planned for release at 1:30 p.m. Friday and broadcast on Facebook at noon Sunday.“We’ve been in the process of having senior experience, which this year is all based around pay it forward,” said district AVID Director Amy Anderson.AVID stands for Advancement Via Individual Determination. Its mission is to close the achievement gaps by preparing all students for college readiness and success in a global society, the district’s AVID website said.Anderson’s daughter, Abigail, is a senior this year and she got to participate in the senior experience which involved an art project that showed the impact one small gesture can have on people’s lives.“I really enjoyed it,” Abigail Anderson said. “I think that it definitely was something that let us be free … It kind of felt like before, pre-COVID. We were all able to get together and do an activity together that was fun and engaging.”Abigail Anderson, 18, said she plans to attend Angelo State University to study biology. She hopes to become a doctor of some type.“I’m not sure if I want to go all the way and become a surgeon, or be a pediatrician. … I’m just going go with the flow,” Abigail Anderson added.She noted that she has found AVID very helpful. Her first year of the program was her freshman year of high school.“… It taught me a lot of different study tips and how to manage my time and just keep myself organized in my school life and outside of my school life,” Abigail Anderson said.She has an older sister and a younger sister.Complex Community Federal Credit Union, a stalwart partner of AVID, helped them put the video together. Former AVID student Matthew Alvarez at CBS 7 will be the emcee and there are several guest speakers, Anderson said.“We’re excited to have him back as part of our alumni that are giving back to our seniors and helping them create this celebration,” she added.Complex Community will be awarding scholarships and the two seniors selected to give speeches for graduation will get a $500 scholarship.As AVID always does, each campus will receive Kindles that will be raffled off for those students exhibiting behaviors and skills and character that support AVID. They will get a chance to win a Kindle as part of the middle and high school campus celebrations.Seniors participate in the Senior Experience with the theme of pay it forward.“That art project that she’s talking about is going to be an eight-foot monument for the … seniors of 2021; Our class of seniors for 2020. Their senior experience art is going to be installed at UTPB, but COVID just put a little bit of a delay on that so they may be going up at the same time.” Amy Anderson said. “But we just, again, want to have our seniors have the opportunity to come together as a collective cohort of ECISD alumni that are moving on and kind of leave … a little piece of them. They can come back and tell their kids like when I was a senior we did this.”Anderson said this is the second year that a piece of art has been created and installed somewhere in the community.Amy Anderson said there are 7,077 students in AVID.“… We have five elementary schools that do it school wide. So, there are campuses that implement AVID K through five and what’s very interesting is that we also partner with both Odessa College and UTPB who both utilize AVID …,” Amy Anderson said.She added that there are plans to implement AVID on more campuses.“It’s definitely a possibility,” Amy Anderson said.Pre-pandemic, AVID piloted a leadership coaching program where community members mentored the students at Bonham Middle School and plans were to scale up to all the middle schools.“We are in the second session of our middle school leadership coaching and we are doing that virtually. We did one cohort in the fall and now we’re in the second in the spring only at Bonham. Currently, we have about 30 students. We take about three of those students and we pair them with a community coach, a volunteer from our community with an ECISD host to help support the technology and just have a well-rounded group to be able to serve our kiddos. In case anything comes up, they have an ECISD host there to help,” Amy Anderson said.Amy Anderson said conducting the sessions virtually was different.“We learned a lot of things so we’ve refined that and changed a few processes. It is going better this time, but it’s … difficult. You would think it would be easier, but it’s difficult to build those relationships and capacities in a very short time over a Zoom with a sixth grader,” Amy Anderson said.She noted that they have had to develop Zoom etiquette. When they come into a Zoom meeting, they should come in on mute and they should stay on mute unless they’re speaking. Then they should turn their camera on so everybody sees everyone and introduce themselves.“I did not take a group because I’m trying to manage all the groups, so my role is to make sure that all the coaches are there first. We ask them to log in at 12 and then they can have a little prep time before the kids get in. The kids get in at any time between 12:10 and 12:15. They have a 30-minute session with them … I pop into the rooms, take attendance, and then closer to the end of that session, I drop a link and for reflection so that everybody has the opportunity to let me know how the session went; what went well; what didn’t go so well. And then I can make adjustments before the next session if there are adjustments to be made. …,” Amy Anderson said.At the end of the year, she said, they will have a celebration where the coaches drive through the Bonham parking lot. There was a celebration at the end of the fall semester as well.Remaining COVID friendly, the coaches will drive through the parking lot again this spring, honking their horns and flashing their lights. The students will come out and stand and make posters to thank the coaches.Students will get a T-shirt that has AVID leadership on it. The coaches will get a T-shirt also. WhatsApp WhatsApp Twitter Virtual AVID celebration coming uplast_img read more

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FHA Announces New Deadline to Request Mortgage Forbearance

first_img The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, Government, News Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Related Articles The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago  Print This Post FHA Announces New Deadline to Request Mortgage Forbearance About Author: Christina Hughes Babb Christina Hughes Babb is a reporter for DS News and MReport. A graduate of Southern Methodist University, she has been a reporter, editor, and publisher in the Dallas area for more than 15 years. During her 10 years at Advocate Media and Dallas Magazine, she published thousands of articles covering local politics, real estate, development, crime, the arts, entertainment, and human interest, among other topics. She has won two national Mayborn School of Journalism Ten Spurs awards for nonfiction, and has penned pieces for Texas Monthly, Salon.com, Dallas Observer, Edible, and the Dallas Morning News, among others. Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago 2021-01-26 Christina Hughes Babb Previous: Bear Witness: Maine Requires Direct Testimony Next: Executive Order Instructs HUD to Examine Disparate Impact Rule Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago January 26, 2021 13,209 Views The Federal Housing Administration (FHA) and U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) today announced it is extending the date to March 31 for single-family homeowners with FHA-insured mortgages to request an initial forbearance from their mortgage servicer to defer their mortgage payments for up to six months. The move comes at the request of the Biden Administration, according to a press release.”On the first day of his new Administration, President Biden took immediate actions to stem the economic devastation experienced by the nation’s hardworking families because of the pandemic,” said Acting HUD Secretary Matthew Ammon. “Today’s extension supports the President’s direction by providing more time for homeowners to seek mortgage payment relief.”According to a press release, FHA requires mortgage servicers to provide up to six months of COVID-19 forbearance when a homeowner requests this assistance, and up to an additional six months of forbearance for homeowners who request an extension of the initial forbearance. Homeowners needing assistance must engage with their servicer to obtain an initial forbearance or to obtain an extension of the initial forbearance on or before the March 31 deadline.Upon announcing the previous extension in October, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Single Family Housing Joe Gormley expounded on the importance of keeping up with payments when possible.”It’s always in a homeowner’s best interest to make their mortgage payments if they are able. But for those who are struggling right now, we urge them to engage with their servicer immediately. And, if your servicer contacts you, it is crucial that you respond to them to let them know if you need assistance. The last thing FHA wants is for any homeowner to risk losing their homeownership investment if they are eligible for assistance.”Tuesday’s forbearance request extension aligns with FHA’s recent extension of its foreclosure and eviction moratoria, also extended through March 31.Borrowers with FHA-insured mortgages seeking additional information on available options should visit FHA’s COVID-19 Resources for Homeowners web page on FHA.gov. Other borrowers are encouraged to visit the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s Coronavirus Mortgage and Housing Assistance web pages. Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Subscribe Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Share Save Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Home / Daily Dose / FHA Announces New Deadline to Request Mortgage Forbearancelast_img read more

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Senior Advocate Yatin Oza Withdraws His Resignation As The President Of GHCAA

first_imgNews UpdatesSenior Advocate Yatin Oza Withdraws His Resignation As The President Of GHCAA LIVELAW NEWS NETWORK2 Jun 2020 10:25 PMShare This – xSenior Advocate Yatin Oza has withdrawn his resignation as the President of the Gujarat High Court Advocates’ Association, after several members of the Bar earnestly requested him to do so. Oza had resigned from his office following differences among the Office bearers of the Association regarding re-opening of the courts for physical hearing. He had tendered his resignation to…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginSenior Advocate Yatin Oza has withdrawn his resignation as the President of the Gujarat High Court Advocates’ Association, after several members of the Bar earnestly requested him to do so. Oza had resigned from his office following differences among the Office bearers of the Association regarding re-opening of the courts for physical hearing. He had tendered his resignation to General Secretary Hardik Brahmbhatt and had sought a fresh mandate of the Bar on the issue “whether the court should function physical or virtual’. Following Differences Over Re-opening Of Courts For Physical Appearance, GHCAA President Yatin Oza Resigns; Seeks Fresh Mandate In the backdrop of this episode, the Managing Committee of the GHCAA convened an extraordinary urgent meeting at 10 pm on Tuesday, June 2, whereby the Committee unanimously rejected the resignation. The Committee also passed a resolution, requesting Mr. Oza to withdraw his letter of resignation. Obliging to the wishes of the Committee, as well as several Bar members who urged him to not demit the office, Mr. Oza withdrew his resignation and circulated a message stating, “Dear Friends, In view of the fact that I felt helpless in resolving the issue of junior Advocates, who are in dire state, I sent my letter of resignation. In view of overwhelming phone calls and messages from Seniors and Juniors alike, 25 of whom have threatened to go on indefinite hunger strike, I hereby withdraw my resignation letter, as I am left with no option, but to accept the requests of all Bar members. I have always stood by them and will stand and fight for their rights till the end. I will immediately take up all the issues again with the concerned authorities and try and resolve the issues as early, as possible Including physical functioning of all courts in state of Gujarat. Yatin Oza” Oza has been elected to hold the office of the President of the GHCAA for as many as 17 times. He had tendered his resignation yesterday after General Secretary of the Association, Prithviraj Jadeja, wrecked his attempt to convince a Chief Justice led panel to re-open courts for physical hearings. He expressed his regret for having “failed to wipe out their miseries” and withdrew from the office. Significantly, as per the Constitution of the GHCAA, resignation does not require any formal approval. It becomes effective immediately once it is received by the recipients competent to accept, which as per the Constitution is the Secretary General or the Vice President. Next Storylast_img read more

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