Middle Island Teen Killed in Car Crash

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 16-year-old Middle Island boy was killed when the vehicle he was a passenger in crashed in Medford early Friday morning, injuring three other teens.Suffolk County police said David Longford, 17, was driving a Toyota with three passengers northbound on Gray Avenue when he lost control of the vehicle, struck a tree and overturned at 1:20 a.m.David Ross, a passenger who was ejected from the vehicle, was taken to Brookhaven Memorial Hospital Medical Center in East Patchogue where he was pronounced dead.Longford and a 17-year-old male passenger, 17, both of Medford, were taken to Brookhaven Memorial Hospital Medical Center for treatment of non-life-threatening injuries.The third passenger, a 15-year-old boy, was taken to Saint Charles Hospital in Port Jefferson, also for treatment of non-life-threatening injuries.Longford was ticketed for unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle.Sixth Squad detectives impounded for a safety check, are continuing the investigation and ask anyone with information about this crash to contact them at 631-854-8652 or call anonymously to Crime Stoppers at 1-800-220-TIPS. All calls will remain confidential.last_img read more

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The value of exposure opportunities

first_img 1SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Lois Kitsch For American credit unions, which operate in one of the world’s most competitive, and metrics-driven industries, Lois Kitsch is the cooperative conscience. With 35 plus years of credit union … Web: https://cudifference.com Details “Seeing the sun come up in a new environment is transformational.  Exposure to new cultures, ideas and realities is not a luxury, it is the one thing that can vastly change your perspective in a matter of weeks, days, hours, minutes.”– Lois Kitsch I-CUDEOver the past two decades, I have had the opportunity, though my credit union work, to visit six continents and almost 70 countries.  This exposure has taken a drive-up teller from North Dakota to a global traveler who has experienced life and its joys and complexities in places beyond my earlier comprehension.  These experiences have completely changed my life – created a richer version than I had ever dreamed possible. Today, I work hard to do the same for others – to create that same joy of building relationships in far and unknown places, to foster understanding of other cultures and to go far beyond the idea that “I am here to teach”.  Travel of credit union leaders and employees brings value back to the institution as well.  Travel should happen for anyone who wants to broaden their career opportunities. For travel, especially global travel, inspires people to see people where they are  – to examine issues that at home they tend to ignore. Mark Twain may have said it best when he said “Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all of one’s lifetime.” Travel opens your views to new thinking in a way that no book or article can.  You learn to see others where they are and accept their differences. Experiences help you look around and see what people need and what you have to offer to solve that need.  Travel makes you vulnerable when you don’t understand the culture or speak the language but travel also makes you strong and resilient and able to manage unexpected change. In our country today, meaningful conversation needs to happen.  When you have meaningful conversation with people from different cultures and hear and explore different ideas, you become more open to the beliefs of others – including in the work place. You can learn from unexpected places and even the most obscure idea can spark an idea that is relevant and beneficial to you and your organization. Over the past three years, I have coordinated two visits to Africa and one to Asia for credit union professionals from the US, Caribbean and Canada.  Most recently I worked with my business partner Mark Lynch to coordinate a visit of African credit union professionals and volunteers to visit Madison.  One universal thing that I have learned from all four occasions – I felt transformed by the experience and that the experience brought true value back to me, my family and to my work.  I feel certain that other travelers felt the same way. More importantly, I believe we all came back feeling we were a better person making all the planning worth the effort. Are you interested in broadening your horizon and changing (enhancing) your perspective?   Come – join us on a global tour.If you are interested in a global experience to Africa, Australia or the UK in 2020 please contact me at lois@cudifference.com.last_img read more

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FLU SERIES Scrambling for vaccine: Colorado official views shortage as temporary

first_img Calonge said he hopes that with roughly 58 million doses of vaccine nationwide, “We should be able to cover, not all those people who need one (shot), but all those people who seek one.” Colorado is using regional public health emergency planners and epidemiologists hired through a bioterrorism grant to collect that data, Parmenter said. Planners in each of 13 regions are surveying vaccine needs as part of their role in bioterrorism emergency response and disease surveillance. CDC recommendations on who should get flu vaccine during the shortagehttp://www.cdc.gov/nip/news/newsltrs/imwrks/2004/200410.htm#topstory Nov 19, 2004 (CIDRAP News) – Before the current influenza vaccine shortage arose, Colorado was vaccinating people in mass clinics. After the shortage hit, the preventive medicine chief for the state’s Kaiser Permanente clinics found himself driving around with leftover vaccine in his car, calling for information on which hospitals needed the doses. “We see them as dual-purpose,” Parmenter said. “It has been very helpful to us.” The planners were completing the needs assessment this week, she said. The state expects to submit an updated vaccine request next week. See also: “Rather than an absolute shortage, this is one of time and place,” he said. But while some states have gone beyond the CDC’s recommendations by excluding healthcare workers or raising the eligible age for vaccine recipients. Colorado has not, Calonge said. As reported in a previous story, he said he has no “scientific basis on which to reprioritize.” Still, Calonge is taking a long view on a shortage that many have called a crisis. “If you’re a long-term care facility, should you immunize the residents or the staff first?” he asked. “If you’re sitting in a long-term care room, the flu isn’t going to climb in the window. Somebody brings it in.” The health department is assessing who still needs vaccine, Calonge said. The supply woes have fostered on-the-ground redistribution among providers, Calonge said. In one case five vials of vaccine, or 50 doses, were moved from one clinic to another. That suggests the magnitude of the shift that Ned Calonge, MD, MPH, chief medical officer for the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE), said he and his staff are overseeing. Calonge said he worried that the doses given out during Colorado’s early flu vaccine clinics could count against the state’s final tally of doses, even though the state can’t ascertain how many high-risk people were vaccinated. Colorado has an estimated 1.1 million to 1.2 million high-risk people. The state had received more than 200,000 doses of vaccine before the shortage emerged, Calonge said, but it’s not clear how many of those vaccinated were in the priority categories listed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta. Nonetheless, officials have kept the vulnerable populations of long-term care facilities in mind. The vaccine issues have prompted far-ranging policy discussions among healthcare leaders in Colorado, and questions linger, Calonge said. In the weeks following the announcement that 48 million doses of vaccine from Chiron Corp. would not be available, the state received about 196,000 doses in the first phase of the CDC-coordinated distribution of remaining supplies. Last week the state got another 66,500 doses, said Cindy Parmenter, communications director for the CDPHE. “It’s a shortage in time and space. I am optimistic that everyone in the priority group who wants a flu shot should be able to get one,” Calonge said in a Nov 10 interview. “Eventually.” Overall, though, he remains optimistic that redistribution will prove effective.last_img read more

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USS deficit hits £6.6bn as chief exec warns on market outlook

first_imgSummer market volatility has pushed up USS’ deficit and could affect negotiations over contribution ratesThe CEO said there had been a “downwards drift” in real yields for much of the past year, which had “become pronounced in recent weeks”.“At the end of July the real yield on 20-year UK index-linked Gilts was -2.20%, and in August they have fallen even lower,” Galvin said. “At the time of the last trustee meeting [on] 21 August they stood at -2.44%.”Using the technical provisions basis of valuing scheme assets and liabilities, this meant USS’ funding deficit was £6.6bn as of the end of July, he said. This compared to the £3.6bn shortfall reported on 31 March 2018.USS reported a £5.7bn shortfall in its annual accounts as of the end of March 2019, although this used data from the March 2017 valuation, which has since been replaced by the 2018 valuation. In addition, actuaries have warned that the scheme’s next valuation, due to use data as of 31 March 2020, might not produce contributions rates lower than currently scheduled.If UUK and UCU agree to the 30.7% contribution rate, it will be in place until October 2021, after which the combined rate will increase to 34.7% of salary, with members paying 11%.However, in an analysis of the contribution schedule – which will be out for consultation in September – Aon actuaries John Coulthard, Andrew Claringbold and Joanna Davies said the deterioration of market conditions was “concerning”.“There is no guarantee that the 2020 actuarial valuation will result in contributions that are lower than 34.7% from 1 October 2021,” they wrote.Regulator voices concernsEarlier this month the Pensions Regulator (TPR) wrote to USS trustee board chairman Sir David Eastwood to outline concerns over the route being taken by the scheme.The planned contribution schedule – referred to as ‘option 3’ based on choices presented to stakeholders in May – “misses the opportunity to secure a material amount of cash funding for the scheme in the short term”, wrote TPR director of supervision Mike Birch.Birch also highlighted scenario analysis work conducted by the USS trustee board, which showed that there was a 5% chance of the scheme requiring total contributions of as much as 55% of salary. There was a 22% chance of an increase to “above 40%”, he said.“Of course, many assumptions underlie such projections but the overall message is clear – the risk of some very serious downside scenarios arising over relatively short periods of time is not insignificant,” he said.The trustees and other stakeholders “must actively monitor and manage this risk”, Birch said, and decide what actions should be taken in such circumstances, including asset sales, delays to capital expenditure, and changes to benefits. The funding shortfall for the UK’s largest pension scheme has increased to £6.6bn (€7.3bn), according to its chief executive.Bill Galvin, CEO of the Universities Superannuation Scheme (USS), detailed the effects on the scheme of negative real yields on government bonds in a 23 August email to Alistair Jarvis, chief executive of employer organisation Universities UK (UUK).The news comes as UUK and the University and College Union (UCU) are attempting to negotiate a new schedule of contributions. Employers have backed a combined contribution of 30.7% of salary, with members paying 9.6%. However, the UCU has demanded that member contributions remain at 8%, and has threatened strike action.Galvin said USS’ trustee board would have to make a judgement on how to interpret recent market movements and factor them in to the 2018 valuation decision. UK regulations require all schemes to carry out a formal valuation at least every three years, including assessing contribution rates. Galvin said: “Given recent volatility in financial markets and the regulatory requirement that the trustee conclude [that] the long-term assumptions underpinning the funding proposals remain safe, there is a real risk that the trustee will, at the end of the consultation and before concluding the valuation, need to reconsider the contribution rates and/or evaluate other mitigating actions that may be required.”last_img read more

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Dad demands abortion after surrogate learns she’s having triplets

first_imgFox News 25 November 2015A man who paid a surrogate to have his baby became overwhelmed when he learned she was having triplets — and demanded the woman abort one of the fetuses while threatening her with financial ruin, she claims.“They are human beings. I bonded with these kids. This is just not right,” mom-to-be Melissa Cook told The Post on Tuesday.Cook’s heart-wrenching dilemma comes as Gov. Andrew Cuomo and state lawmakers are weighing whether New York should lift its ban on commercial surrogacy, which was enacted in 1993.Keep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.The babies’ dad, a Georgia man, hired Cook for $33,000 to have a child by in-vitro fertilization using his sperm and the eggs of a 20-year-old donor.The California woman was implanted with three embryos, which defied the odds to all go on to develop normally.http://www.foxnews.com/health/2015/11/25/dad-demands-abortion-after-surrogate-learns-shes-having-triplets.htmllast_img read more

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Lawrenceburg Public Library District opens doors again

first_imgLawrenceburg, IN—The Lawrenceburg Public Library District branch buildings are re-opening for limited hours starting Monday, June 8. To keep everyone as safe as possible from COVID-19, there will be a time limit of 30 minutes in the buildings, along with a few new guidelines. Temporary hours for Lawrenceburg will be 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday and Wednesday and noon to 7 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday. North Dearborn will be open from noon to 7 p.m. Monday and Wednesday and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday.Designated bins will be located in the buildings to place materials that have been touched, but not checked out. This will give staff members the chance to properly sanitize materials before returning them to the shelves. Continue to return all checked-out materials to the outside drop boxes. While in the buildings, maintain a social distance of at least six feet. Patrons also are requested to use masks, in addition to the staff.Computer use will be by appointment only with a limit of 30 minutes, three times a week. To make an appointment call Lawrenceburg at 812-537-2775 or North Dearborn Branch at 812-637-0777.If you prefer, curbside pick up will remain available during the temporary business hours at North Dearborn and drive-through from noon to 4 p.m. Monday and Wednesday and 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday at Lawrenceburg.last_img read more

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Fulham back in for Bent – reports

first_imgFulham have lodged a second bid for Aston Villa forward Darren Bent, according to reports. According to several national newspapers, the Cottagers are said to have made a £5million offer for the former England striker, who has fallen out of favour at Villa Park following the emergence of Christian Benteke. Bent has two years remaining on his contract and Fulham would look to play him alongside Dimitar Berbatov. Press Associationlast_img read more

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Ayre open to Gerrard return on loan

first_imgLiverpool chief executive Ian Ayre has left the door open for Steven Gerrard to return on loan once he moves to Los Angeles Galaxy. “I’ve said openly to Steven and his representatives, as have Brendan and the owners, that we see Steven as part of the family,” he told Liverpool radio station CityTalk. “The fact that he’s leaving at the end of the season doesn’t mean it’s the last we’ll see of him at Liverpool. “What that means, the details aren’t known yet, but we will keep a regular dialogue with him and I hope we will see him here again in the long term.” Asked if that could mean a return on loan next January, Ayre said: “It’s conceivable. It happens a lot in MLS, and it’s something we talked to Steven and his representatives about. “You can’t have someone who has so much of the club’s DNA in them and just expect that it will go away.” Last week Rodgers drew a line under the debate over Gerrard’s contract after the player said he would have signed a new deal had it been offered last summer. Liverpool’s approach did not arrive until November, by which time Gerrard was already considering other options having been told by Rodgers his playing time would be managed as the oldest member of the squad. Ayre insists the timing of a “substantial” contract offer would not have made a difference. The Reds captain will end his 25-year-long association with his boyhood club this summer when he departs for a new challenge in Major League Soccer. Principal owner John Henry and manager Brendan Rodgers have both said there will always be a role for the midfielder at the club whenever he decides to return from America, but Ayre has not ruled out the possibility of the 34-year-old pulling on the red shirt again. “Let’s assume that we’d made that offer (in the summer) and that he’d signed it. I think we’d still be in the same position today,” he added. “Just like any player, at any club, if he all of a sudden isn’t playing every week, they maybe start to think ‘Maybe this isn’t the place for me now’. “Steven may have signed that contract but we may have been sat round now in the same position. “We’ve had that before with very senior players. I had one come to me and say ‘I don’t really fancy this any more’. “Who knows how it would have played out? But I think Steven made the point last week that it (not playing every week) doesn’t appeal to him. “So the fact that he would have signed a contract last season actually doesn’t make any difference. “His point was that after playing every week, playing a bit-part role is not how he wanted to finish his career. “He wants to finish on a high and I am sure he will.” Press Associationlast_img read more

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Martin County Woman With Pending COVID-19 Test Arrested for Walking around downtown Stuart

first_imgSTUART, Fla. — Stuart Police arrested a Martin County woman accused of failing to quarantine or isolate herself while waiting to receive the results of her COVID-19 test.Wednesday, police say 38-year-old Melissa Barton was seen walking in downtown Stuart.According to an arrest report, Barton had been active on Facebook discussing her COVID-19 test that she took 11-days before her arrest. The report says according to witnesses, Barton had entered a clothing store and shopped for a brief time and then exited the store, continuing to walk around the downtown area.The report states, “The witnesses expressed grave concern for the safety and health of themselves and others.”Police also wrote that on April 1, Barton posted a video on Facebook just hours prior to making contact with police stating she believed her test would come back positive.“There were about three or four calls that came in. A couple of my detectives got some phone calls from the downtown business people who I guess identified this woman from Facebook. The initial call was the concern she could be COVID positive,” said Stuart Police Chief Joseph Tumminelli.Officers arrested her for disorderly conduct and violation of Governor Ron Desantis’ Executive Order.“This lady left our hands tied and we had to take her to the Martin County Jail,” Chief Tumminelli said.According to the Governor’s Executive Order 20-51, anyone who meets the CDC’s definition of a PUI (Person Under Investigation) is supposed to be isolated or quarantined for a period of 14 days or until the person tests negative for COVID-19.Barton is among the many still waiting for a test result.Her social media indicates she was experiencing symptoms days before she was able to get a test. She told police she no longer had symptoms. Guidance from the Florida Department of Health states that people should begin to quarantine themselves for 14 days beginning on the day they believe they were exposed to the coronavirus.Chief Tumminelli says his officers are not instructed to go looking for arrests, calling this a more extreme case.“The intent is not to arrest. The intent is to educate and ask for the compliance,” Tumminelli said. “But if my officers do come across someone, a group of ten or more, they’re going to tell them hey, practice social distancing. We’re not going to make arrests on that, only in extreme circumstances to where our hands are tied. If I can get somebody to go home who needs to go home, they’ll go home.”Barton was released from jail with an ankle monitor.Court records show she will be confined to her home with the GPS tracking device until she receives a negative test.last_img read more

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Benitez Reveals Spain Wanted Him as Manager at Russia 2018

first_imgSpeaking to the Newcastle Chronicle yesterday, Benitez said: “There was maybe a chance, but still I am here and I am happy to be here. There was a chance. There were rumours about that.”Benitez said that Newcastle may have to sell before they can buy new players in the transfer window.Newcastle has so far signed goalkeeper Martin Dubravka on a permanent deal after a loan spell last season while former Swansea midfielder, Ki Sung-Yueng, has joined as a free agent. Newcastle re-engaged Brazilian attacker Kennedy on loan from Chelsea.“Unfortunately it’s what we have to do,” said Benitez, “We have to wheel and deal, that is the way for us.“We have to be realistic with our budget, and then maybe sell some players and buy some players.”Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram Newcastle Manager, Rafael Benitez, has revealed he was approached by the Spanish Football Federation to temporarily take charge of Spain at the 2018 World Cup in Russia.BBC Sport reported yesterday that the RFEF wanted the 58-year-old to take charge after Julen Lopetegui was sacked two days before Spain’s opening match.Fernando Hierro took charge on an interim basis as Spain went on to lose on penalties to Russia in the Last-16.Ex-Barcelona Coach, Luis Enrique, has now been appointed on a two-year contract.last_img read more

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